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BOOK REVIEW

 
 
 
 

Title

: The Act That Wasn’t

Author

: Bobby George

Publishers

: Power Publisher 2017

Pages

: 183
 

The Pharmaceutical industry is highly regulated all over the world. India is no exception (as a matter of fact it is over regulated and under implemented). India ranks 3rd in the world in terms of volume and 14th in terms of value. Nearly 40% of the generic drugs manufactured by Indian Pharmaceutical companies are sold in the Western or developed markets of USA and Europe.  We often read in the lay press that United States Food & Drug Administration (USFDA) bans certain formulations manufactured by Indian companies for lack of regulatory compliances. But for the recent ban of large number of Fixed Dose Combinations (FDCs), which is now stayed by the Honorable Courts, we do not hear such bans of substandard formulations in the Indian market by the Government. Is there a double standard in the quality of drugs consumed by Indian patients as against Western?

 

That brings us to the book, ‘The Act that wasn’t’ under review. The contents of the book cover wide range of issues in as many as 12 chapters. The book addresses issues ranging from ‘Acts and acts’ to ‘Reformative acts’. These chapters deal with how acts are enacted, repeal and replacement, dysfunctional, unhealthy, clinical study, organ transplant, surrogacy, biosimilar and whistle blower protection act etc. The range of titles of chapters is suggestive of the fact that regulating healthcare industry is very complex and the operative part is still more difficult. Unlike USFDA, in India the licensing agency for manufacturing of drugs is under the state Drugs Control and the policy making is by the Drugs Controller General of India (under Govt of India).  The author has tried to give the background of each ‘Act’, compare it with such acts in other countries, and explain the pit falls and in many cases give corrective measures. The contents are appropriately supported by references.  Some of the measures suggested are reducing timelines for review, issuance of new rules and guidelines, strengthening existing standards and practices, digitalization drive besides others.

 

The author, Dr Bobby George is a pharmaceutical scientist of long standing in the industry. He presently heads the regulatory affairs division in a leading company. The views and descriptions given are based on real experiences and are authentic. The writings are simple and straight forward. The contents are related to Govt ‘Acts’, an eminent former justice of the apex court of India has written the foreword to the book. The book is recommended as an informative text for teaching ‘Forensic sciences/pharmacy’ and also for libraries in pharmaceutical institutions and industry, and even for the libraries of Law colleges and Universities.

 

Reviewed By: Professor S. K. Kulkarni.

 
 

Title

: Views And Reviews 3

Author

: Professor Harkishan Singh

Publishers

:  Association of Pharmaceutical Teachers of India, Bangalore

Pages

 

Recently, when an announcement came that Professor Harkishan Singh has been chosen for Padma Shri Award, I was one among his long list of students whose joy was limitless. Therefore, it was natural for me to rush to his place to personally congratulate him, having the advantage of being only a few kms away from his residence. My best half was also most happy to accompany me. After an hour of blissful time together, when we rose to leave, Professor Singh gifted me his latest treatise entitled ‘Views and Reviews 3’ published by APTI, Bangalore. As also outlined in preface in the book by Prof. Singh, this is the third volume in the series. The first volume was published in 2008, second in 2012 and the current volume in 2016, each after a gap of four years. Although this series is a compilation of already published articles, what is creditable indeed, is the dedication being put in by Professor Singh at his tender age of 88 plus years to tie information into bound volumes, for the benefit of future generations.

 
Respecting my teacher and Guru, I have thoroughly gone through the book, page to page, and found all 25 chapters to be an interesting reading. In particular, it was an eye opener on how much effort had gone in bringing NIPER into existence. The long history of the institute has been traced very lucidly in 7 chapters. I consider myself most lucky and privileged person to enjoy the fruits of efforts by very worthy peers, as myself happens to be the first employee of NIPER, SAS Nagar (mention on p. 135) and by that virtue of any of the NIPERs.

 
Also, a good part of this treatise is dedicated to luminaries of pharmacy profession, both from India and abroad. These include Prafulla Chandra Ray (A chemist who was behind establishment of Bengal Chemicals and Pharmaceutical Works Limited), Amrut Vithaldas Mody (Chairman and MD, Unichem Laboratories Limited), Mahadev Lal Schroff (Banaras Hindu University; his early life, patriotic fervour and journalistic pursuits are highlighted in two chapters), Kanny Lall Dey (Pioneer proponent of indigenous drugs), Sahib Singh Sokhey (An eminent medico-pharmaceutical professional ), David Waldie (First to start chemical manufacturing in India) and Apostolos Raptakos (Greece born Indian industrialist, who established in partnership m/s Raptakos, Brett & Co Ltd.). In many of these biographical sketches, professional interests and role of these prominent persons in IPA and IPCA activities is highlighted. Atleast one chapter is dedicated to establishment of IPA by Mahadev Lal Schroff and professional affiliation of Bawa Kartar Singh to the Association.

 
Among the other titles, there is one chapter on historical perspective of hospital pharmacy in India; two other titles on medical –pharmaceutical milieu in colonial India, and its inheritance; and two chapters covering history of Madras Medical Journal and The Indian Lancet. The Medicinal Chemistry research in India has been traced under still another heading.

 
Apart from the above, Professor Singh has described the life in his village Khara in 1940s. Also included is narration of one of his interviews, which gives brief account of his life in early years, his family, his coming to study pharmacy, an account of his research and professional activities, and his foray into pharmaceutical history, including in-depth search into life of visionaries of pharmacy profession. And finally, he has included text of his speech at the USciences’ Founders’ day celebrations on conferment of Honorary DSC degree to him. A very brief CV of his is added as an Appendix.

 
I will recommend this 3rd volume to all pharmacy friends and libraries, as it is a very valuable collection of writings of a living legend, who happens to be the only pharmacist to be conferred with Padma Shri

 

Reviewed By: Dr. Saranjit Singh

 

 
 
 

Title

: Drugs & Cosmetics

Author

: Vijay Malik, LL.B, M.B.A. (F.M.S.)

Publishers

:  Eastern Book Company, 34 Lalbagh, Lucknow-226001

Price

:  Rs. 1950
 

The current 25th edition of this most comprehensive and exhaustive manual has been thoroughly revised and updated. The book provides fully amended text of the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 (as amended by Amending Act 26 of 2008 enforced on August 10, 2009) and the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules, 1945 as amended up to the Second Amendment Rules, 2016, along with case-law notes, allied Acts, Rules, Orders and Notifications.

The author has included all the recent notifications and Orders, thus bringing the work up to date. New case-law notes have been added, especially under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940. Various new materials have been incorporated in this edition which include:

1.   Transplantation of Human Organs and Tissues Rules, 2014,

2.   Pharmacy Practice Regulations, 2015,

3.   Number of Licensed Blood Banks in India,

4.   Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI),

5.   Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions and Haemovigilance Programme of India (HvPI),

6.   List of Drugs approved during January 2006 to March 2016,

7.   Updated chapter on Patents and Pharmaceuticals by Elizabeth Verkey,

8.   Transplantation of Human Organs and Tissues Act, 1994,

9.   Transplantation of Human Organs Rules, 1995,

10. National List of approved Testing Laboratories.

The book comes with a Free CD-ROM containing important and useful materials like lists featuring regulations regarding Clinical Trials, I.V. Fluids, Recall and Rapid Alert System for Drugs, Sources of Medicinal Herbs in India, etc.

The EBC Explorer™ is a new feature of this edition, which provides online access to Free updates to this edition by logging on to www.ebcexplorer.com..

 

 
 

Title

: Pharmaceutical Marketing Management

Author

: Dr. N. Udupa & Dr. D Sreedhar

Publishers

 

The book begins with a brief overview of Indian and Global Pharmaceutical Market. It discusses unconventional topics related to pharmaceutical marketing. Most of the chapters like Segmentation, Promotional Mix, Consumer Behaviour and Pricing etc, explain the basic concepts with an emphasis on the Phrama perspective. Chapters are updated with recent developments in those fields. Clinical Research has always been under scan, the chapter on clinical research covers the latest amendments and discusses the future trends. Chapter Cosmeceutical gives an overview of Cosmeceutical market scenario and the growth drivers. The book includes a brief note on Ethics.
Dr N Udupa is Professor and Director- Research (Health Sciences), Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka. Dr N Udupa received his PhD in 1987 from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. After serving in Pharma Industry for 8 years, he has been working in academics for last 30 years. Dr N Udupa is prolific researcher and author with more than 500 research and review articles, over 400 presentations in national and international conferences. He has authored about 15 books. He is on the editorial boards and advisory bodies of several reputed journals. He is a life member of some 20 associations and societies. He has nine Indian patents to his credit. He has won many awards for his outstanding contributions in Pharmaceutical Research and Education. He served as Convener-Scientific Services of Indian Pharmaceutical Congress Association from 2010 to 2012.
Dr D Sreedhar is Associate Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacy Management, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka. He completed his PhD in 2010 from Manipal University, Manipal. After working in a pharmaceutical company for about two years he joined academics in 2003. Dr Sreedhar is author of over 100 research and review articles and more than 100 oral and poster presentations at conferences worldwide. He is author of five chapters in various books and an editorial board member of journals of repute. He is life member of over ten professional associations and societies. He is secretary of Indian Pharmaceutical Association, Manipal Branch. He received “Distinguished Alumnus Award” by MCOPS in the year 2014.

 

 
 

Title

: Pharmacists Digest

Author

: Dr. B. D. Miglani

Publishers

 

Pharmacist Digest by Dr. B. D. Miglani gives insight regarding how profession of pharmacy developed over the 5 decades of his professional carrier. It includes various articles published in various journals and presidential address given by B. D. Miglani during various national and international platforms and some of the chapters in the text books. This book mainly emphasizes on development of hospital pharmacy/ pharmacists, their educational requirement and pay scales compared to other professional staff in health care organizations. Presented articles related to old method of functioning of hospital pharmacy. Need of pharmacy in hospitals, status of pharmacy in 1960's, problems of getting containers for dispensed medications at that time were highlighted. Some of the articles highlighted the importance of Implementation of D. Pharm. courses and uniformity in B. Pharm. and postgraduate syllabus, also given development of metric system/apothecary systems and its equivalent used in the practice of pharmacy in the hospitals. Recommended Importance of master degree in hospital pharmacy also presented in the some of the seminar. Importance of pre-packing of medicine and its labeling also discussed. Some of the articles discussed regarding hospital pharmacy organization, its management storage of drugs, improve the standard of pharmacists, and improve the number of pharmacists. Also discussed regarding various statutory bodies, professional associations and their roles in pharmacy education. Chapters on Organization of pharmaceutical services in Hospital, which includes organization of hospital pharmacy, personal, polices, drug distribution system, departmental staff, location, space, equipment, Pharmacy therapeutic Committee, Hospital formulary, Drug information center, Central sterile supply room etc. in the Text Book Professional Pharmacy by M. L. Schroff were included in Pharmacists Digest. By looking at the content of Pharmacists Digest, it is definitely useful for the faculty and the students of pharmacy colleges to understand how profession of pharmacy in hospitals developed and how our professional leaders contributed towards growth of pharmacy profession in India.
 
Book Reviewed by:-
Leelavathi D. Acharya, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, MCOPS. & Dr. N. Udupa, Editor, IJHP & Research Director (Health Sciences), Manipal University.
  

 

 
 

 

Multi-Volume Book Series on “NanoBioMedicine” Released

 

It was an unparalleled accomplishment for any institute when the six-volume book series on a highly sought-after emerging area of “NanoBioMedicine” was recently released by Professor K K Bhutani, Director, NIPER, Mohali and Dr VSV Vadlamudi Rao, President, Indian Pharmaceutical Association, Mumbai. The multi-volume book set furnishes high quality insight into a gamut of novel and evolving subjects topics spanning this multidisciplinary science of NanoBioMedicine, including nano-based drug delivery systems, theranostic agents, nanopharmaceuticals, functionalized therapeutic nanocarriers, and several nanobiotechnological approaches.
The mega book series has been compiled after two years of concerted efforts under the stewardship of Professor Bhupinder Singh Bhoop (Chairman, University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), and Coordinator, UGC Center of Excellence in NanoBiomedical Applications, Panjab University, Chandigarh) as its Editor-in-Chief. With the Foreword by Bharat Ratna Professor C N R Rao, a globally renowned scientist in general, and a nanotechnologist in particular, the mega book series comprise of a total of 93 book chapters. Contributions by more than 450 experts from diverse disciplines of Nanotechnology, Biology, Medicine, Biomedical Sciences and Pharma Sciences adorn the multi-volume book series. ‎Contributing authors hail from across the globe including, Australia, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Oman, Portugal, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, UAE, UK and USA.
The entire book series has been meticulously designed and printed by M/s Studium Press Publications LLC, Chicago, USA, with International ISBN No.: 1-62699-051-6.
 

The Fundamental Details of The Six- Volume Series Include:
Volume 1 (Nanomedicine); Editors: Prof Jagat R Kanwar, Deakin University, Australia; Prof O P Katare, Panjab University, India)
Volume 2 (Nanopharmaceuticals); Editors: Prof Kamalinder K Singh; University of Central Lancashire, UK; Dr Gurvinder S Rekhi, University of Georgia, USA)
Volume 3 (Nanotheranostics); Editors: Prof Mandip S Sachdeva; Florida A&M University, USA; Dr Anton Liopo, TomoWave Laboratories Inc, USA)
Volume 4 (Nanostructured Drug Delivery); Editors: Prof Suresh P Vyas, Vice-Chancellor, Dr Hari Singh Gour Vishwavidyalaya, Sagar, India; Prof Indu Pal Kaur, Panjab University, India)
Volume 5 (Medical Nanobiotechnology); Editors: Prof Sanjeev Puri, Panjab University, India; Dr Swaranjit S Cameotra, IMTECH, Chandigarh, India)
Volume 6 (Drug Nanocarriers); Editors Prof Narendra K Jain, Dr H.S. Gour Vishwavidyalaya, Sagar, India; Prof O P Katare, Panjab University, India).
  

 

 
 

Title

: A Concise Textbook of Drug Regulatory Affairs

Author

: N Udupa and Krishnamurthy Bhat

Publishers

 

A concise Textbook of Drug Regulatory Affairs is an honest attempt to publish a book that truly provides vital information on various regulatory aspects. The book truly stands out for its content that are of significant importance to the learners, researchers and professionals in the field of regulatory affairs. The book covers a wide range of topics from Environmental regulations and control to electronic common technical documents. The chapter on Environmental Regulations and Control is important as deals with various regulations applicable to environment in the US, management of pharmaceutical wastes and its treatment, and regulations pertaining to personal safety in pharmaceutical industry. Chapter on regulatory guidelines for Pharmacy Practice gives and overview of regulations for carrying out practice of pharmacy in India and scope of pharmacy practice. Europe being one of the major markets in the field of pharmaceuticals and many Indian companies marketing their products in Europe, understanding regulations for drug registration is of paramount importance. This chapter aptly deals with various mechanisms and provisions for registering a drug in Europe for marketing. Pricing is a major contentious issue in pharmaceutical field. Various regulations related to pricing exist in different countries. Understanding of the pricing regulations may help companies to appropriately price their products in different markets. An chapter on pharmacovigilance provides insights into pharmacovigilance systems in India and the US, as pharmacovigilance ensures safe and appropriate use of medicines. A chapter on Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), including its background, history and trends provides readers with the understanding of various aspects of IPR. Promotion of drugs by pharmaceutical companies has come under intense scrutiny and various regulations pertaining to drug promotion exist. The chapter on regulations and guidelines for drug promotion provide details of regulations by various industry associations and organizations. Companies need to carry out research on drug molecules before marketing and have to follow guidelines by regulatory agencies. Regulations on New Drug Approval in the United States are discussed in the book, which is necessary to understand the drug approval process in the US, largest pharmaceutical market in terms of value. Chapter on Bioequivalence regulations provides valuable information on carrying out bioequivalence studies including patient population, study design, exclusion and inclusion criteria. This is significant for companies as many companies are involved in developing and marketing generic drugs, for which bioequivalence studies become the most important component during marketing approval stages. Product recall is an important issue when deficiencies are found in marketed drugs. The chapter on product recall provides stepwise information on the process of product recall, which would help professionals in the field of regulatory affairs. Chapter on orphan drug regulations is explained in clear, concise and in lucid language. Submission of documents to regulatory agency is a key step in any regulatory affairs related matter. A systemic submission of documents in appropriate format as accepted by regulatory agency is a key to successful marketing approval. The steps of submitting documents are explained in the chapter on electronic common technical document.

 
Overall this book provides and interested read for those in the field of regulatory affairs. An appropriate mix of chapters and topics covered makes this book truly worth read, among the many books claiming to deal with topics on regulatory affairs. This book is must for all involved in the field of regulatory affairs.
 
Book Reviewed by:-
M Surulivel Rajan, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal.
Sreedharan Nair, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal.
  

 

 
 

Title

Sethi’s HPLC – Quantitative Analysis of Pharmaceutical Formulations, Vol. 5-8

Author

: Dr. P. D. Sethi with Rajat Sethi, Santosh Gandhi, Nitin Dubey and Neeraj Sethiya

Publishers

: CBS Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi
 

Recently I got a bulky parcel from m/s CBS Publishers, and on opening it found the Volumes 5-8 of Sethi’s HPLC, which was a surprise, as only last year I had received similar parcel containing three volumes entitled Sethi’s HPTLC. I had reviewed this last set also, and had expressed admiration as to how a person without using computers could churn out such volumes one after another. My admiration this time has grown stronger as this new four volume set is more bulky, with each volume containing almost 500 pages. Volume 5 contains 200 pages of introductory information on HPLC and method validation, which is reduced or expanded at places, in comparison to similar content in volume 1 of the series. In that way, this set has been targeted as an independent purchase.
The set compiles 906 HPLC methods from literature for multi-drug combination formulations, used in different diseases. The volume-wise coverage of drug combinations is as follows: volume 5: musculoskeletal disorders; volume 6: cardiovascular and central nervous systems; volume 7: respiratory and alimentary systems along with antibiotics, and volume 8: preparations for external use and miscellaneous formulations. Like the style of other volumes by Dr Sethi, each method protocol is divided into two opposite pages, one on the left contains structures of the drugs, overlapping UV spectra (wherever reported), chromatogram(s) and the literature reference. On the right page, information is provided on contents of the formulation, therapeutic classification, preparation of standards and samples solutions, internal standards (where used), HPLC system, column, and chromatographic conditions, including temperature. At the end of this page, a note is included on whether the method had been validated for various parameters according to ICH Q2 guideline.
In totality, the set is a huge compilation of literature reported methods. The bench analysts will find it as a ready source of information. I find that most of the methods have appeared and picked up from the so-called ‘on-line’ journals, As credibility of many such journals is not established, therefore, it s possible that a particular method does not prove to be reproducible. As pointed out by Dr Sethi in PREFACE of all the four volumes, such eventuality is expected, and those following a given method must check its reproducibility, and in case of failure, details can be sought from the authors named in the references provided.
Overall, I congratulate Dr Sethi for such huge compilation effort. Surely, this set is valuable for library shelf.
Reviewed by: Dr Saranjit Singh, NIPER, SAS Nagar

 

Dr. P D Sethi is an internationally known pharmaceutical analyst and the author. All his books are in the field of pharmaceutical analysis using different analytical techniques. Recent books published by him on High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) consist of four volumes, entitled “Sethi’s High Performance Liquid Chromatography, Quantitative Analysis of Pharmaceutical formulations”. These four volumes in continuation of earlier 4 volume series on HPLC provide the methods for analysis of 906 fixed dose formulations under different therapeutic categories.
Volume-5 includes information about columns, their maintenance; troubleshooting, Good Laboratory Practices (GLP), Standard Operating Procedures on out of specification (OOS) laboratory results. Chapter 2 consists of validation of analytical methods. Chapter 3 describes methods for quantitative analysis of 154 fixed dose formulations (Skeltal Muscle Disorders).
In volume-6, methods of analysis for 251 fixed dose formulations under cardiovascular system and central nervous system are discussed. The volume-7 describes quantitative analysis of 112 formulations (Respiratory system), 77 formulations (alimentary system) and 70 (antibiotics). The 8th volume describes the methods of analysis for 57 formulations (preparations for external use) and 185 formulations (miscellaneous drugs).
Details of the method of analysis for each formulation is summarized under protocols with complete chromatographic conditions adequate for performing the experiments along with complete literature references. A note at the end of the protocol provides information; whether the method is stability indicating or simply an assay method and also its validation status.
This four volume series in fact is a ready reckoner for the analysts. It is useful in academics and industry as a guideline for the analysis of multi-component formulations. I would like to strongly recommend all four volumes of the book for the students and researchers. It is suggested that the libraries of pharmaceutical institutions not already having volume 1,2,3 and 4 of the series must procure them to complete the 8 volume series.
Reviewed by: Dr. Rajendra B. Kakde, Nagpur University, Nagpur
  

 

 
 

Title

: WITNESS TO AN ERA – AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Author

: Professor Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, Delhi
 

A guided tour of the world of pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences spread across spatial and temporal boundaries

Reviewed By:- M. S. Valiathan
In “Witness to an Era”, we are treated to a guided tour of the world of pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences spread across spatial and temporal boundaries. Professor Harkishan Singh is constantly with us in the tour, describing places and their historical importance, narrating events which became landmarks in the history of science, and celebrating individuals who influenced the course of pharmaceutical history. As an expert guide, Professor Singh has packed his literary tour of over 300 pages with scientific and historical material of much value and authenticity and, at the same time, made it agreeable by savory additives from personal and social history.
The journey begins with a picturesque description of Khara – a village in pre-partition Panjab – and the life of a multi-cultural, rural community, their food habits, dress, pattern of social exclusion, customs, female feticide, high mortality from infectious diseases, marriage of girls at 9 – 10 years, and poor facilities for schooling and medical assistance. The narrative of “village Panjab” is one of the best chapters of the book, generous in friendships, generous in the pride of Sikh ancestry, and generous in aspirations. The scene changed with the British annexation of Punjab, the building of the great canal system for irrigation rapid growth of agriculture, and the opening of schools by the Government and Khalsa. These were no clocks or electricity, but life was settled and cheerful and young Harkishan scored 100% school attendance and developed a love for poetry and book binding!
School was followed by college years in Lahore which was the cultural and educational capital of Panjab. Soon the orderly course of academic progress was violently jolted by the trauma of partition and the fearsome days of 46-47 in Lahore, to which peaceable Harkishan was an alarmed and anxious witness. Someone gave him a sword to protect himself during the days of massacre, but when it got stolen he regarded the loss as good riddance lest he “might not have been able to use it”. Migrating to Amritsar, his family of nine lived in one room without complaints and he himself pursued his studies for B. Pharm. He took to pharmacy as a duck takes to water and thus began his lifelong endeavour in science. A short posting under the legendary Sir Ramnath Chopra in Jammu was inspirational and led to his writing a book on his hero many years later.
The move from Amritsar to BHU for M. Pharm studies was a “release phenomenon” because it opened before him the national vision of Madan Mohan Malaviya and exposed him to the cultural winds blowing from the length and breadth of India. It was an exhilarating experience which heightened his fascination for science. Mentors like Professor Srivastava inspired him and knowledge became his single minded pursuit. He obtained PhD in 1956 and became a Lecturer in Pharmaceutical Chemistry in BHU followed by a move to Saugor as an Assistant Professor, and later to the home ground of Panjab University as Reader. His visits to UK and US on Fellowships during this period made a profound impression and enabled him to investigate hetero steroids and other topics in medicinal chemistry. The many scientific contacts he established in several universities in the UK and US were of much use to him intellectually and materially (performance of analytical tests, supply of chemicals etc.) on returning to India. His work on azasteroidal neuromuscular–blockers and the development of a novel drug “chandonium iodide” drew international attention. The drug passed clinical trials, got approved by the Drug Controller, and was transferred for production to an industry who aborted the product. This example is unhappily not rare in India even today.
Professor Singh became a Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the Panjab University in 1972 and subsequently threw himself into the promotional aspects of pharmaceutical education, setting up an organisation for pharmacy teachers, contributing to the work of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, presenting papers at Conferences in India and abroad and a host of other academic activities. He guided 48 students for M.Sc. and Ph.D many of whom became leaders in the profession in India and abroad. His research endeavour in heterosteroids obtained fourteen patents and led to the publications of 125 research papers. His prolific output also included 18 books, 6 book chapters and over hundred articles on pharmaceutical education and history. Apart from textbooks, his series on the “History of Pharmacy and related aspects” in 7 volumes were classics which had few parallels in higher education in India.
A major achievement of Professor Singh was the key role he played in the establishment of the National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research in Chandigarh as an Institution of National Importance. The model of NIPER has multiplied and has admittedly had a major impact on pharmaceutical education in India.
Professor Singh's love of historical research and enquiry germinated in the soil of bibliophilia of school years and grew steadily as suggested by his keen interest In visiting Museums, libraries, galleries etc., during his frequent visits abroad. But the old love reasserted in full measure in 1980 when he began to withdraw from experimental work and turn to studies in pharmaceutical history. This scholarly Initiative received support from the UGC and the Indian National Science Academy. He built a large personal collection of archival material from India and abroad, which involved numerous visits, personal contacts and much correspondence. Among the many honours, fellowships and other recognitions he received from India and abroad, he has specially cherished the Membership of the Academle Internationale d'Histoire de Ia Pharmacie.
Professor Singh is deeply devoted to this parents, wife, children and grandchildren. His endearing references to them are a delightful feature of his remarkable autobiography and an affirmation of the family values which have always been the pride and glory of the Indian society. A scientist, sage, and scholar - extraordinary, full of years and honour, Professor Singh lives among books and archives and rejoices over "more of the archival material in my possession than can keep me occupied for several years". His life is a vindication of Simone de Beauvoir's observation "If old age Is not to be an absurd parody of our former life, it is essential to go on pursuing ends that give our existence meaning, such as devotion to other people, causes and creative work. This Is the secret of enjoying life at any age".
  

 

 
 

Title

: WITNESS TO AN ERA – AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Author

: Professor Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, Delhi
 

Reviewed By:- V. K. Kapoor
It was amazing to discover that a man of science can be a man of letters too. It was a sheer delight to read “Witness to an Era-An Autobiography” by Professor Harkishan Singh. Written in simple English language without using pompous or boisterous words, the book is un-put-downable. Dr Singh has filled a gap of an utterly sought after narrative of his experiences of life, both personal and professional, for the benefit of posterity. His old-time teacher Professor Pritam Singh, whom Dr Singh specifically met, also deserve a credit for coaxing him to write his biography.
The portion of the book which impressed me most is the description of his childhood and early period of his life spent in village(s) of Punjab, both un-partitioned and partitioned. Born in a humble family his simplistic attitude of life is in commensuration with the glorious words of wisdom “mat uchchi, man neeva”. The narration brings to fore a kaleidoscope of village life of Punjab. The story-telling of his family tree with names of all the members is a tribute to his memory. The description of horrors of partition are moving. It was revealing that the divide between the two major communities existed in prepartition days as indicated by the supply of drinking water at railway stations as Hindu pani and Muslim pani; a practice which thankfully is not existing in independent India. The incident related to the times of prophet Mohammad, where a person not destined to become a scholar become so by the sheer dint of his hard work and determination, seems to have been etched permanently to the psyche of young Harkishan and has been the guiding motto of his life. It also gives credence to the couplet by Allama Iqbal “Khudi ko kar buland itna, ke khuda bande se khud pooche bata teri raza kya hai” (Endow your will with such a power, that at every turn of fate it so be that God himself asks of his slave, ‘what is it that pleases thee’).
In the description of magnificence of Lahore, the eruption of emotions of the poet Mohan Singh in the form of a couplet at the desolate mausoleum of Noorjahan, the pretty wife of emperor Jahangir, is indeed touching.
Adolescent Harkishan Singh’s joining the chemist and druggist Beli Ram and Brothers for a summer job after his matriculation perhaps was a forebode to his life-long career in Pharmacy, the start of which was from Amritsar. His young mind was deeply impressioned by such stalwarts as Sir Robert Robinson, Madame Curie Joliot and later by Sir Ram Nath Chopra, whom he had the occasions to see personally. He was motivated by the qualities and immaculateness of late G.P. Srivastava and late N.K. Basu, his doctoral supervisor, when he moved to Banares Hindu University. A picture of the two taken by him on his personal Argus camera still decorates his study in his home. The period 1956 to 1964, spent at the University of Saugar (now Dr Hari Singh Gour Vishwavidyalaya) gives a glimpse of his entering teaching and research as his professional career. The personality which again left a lasting imprint on him was Professor M.L. Schroff whose biography he has authored in 2005.
Professor Singh’s narration of his journey to USA and the period (1958 to 1961) of stay there forms an interesting part of his biography where events have been described in minutest details. I was wonder struck by his sense of preservation of documents by seeing the reproduction of the Contract for Passage Ticket for his journey towards America. How destiny plays a part in one life is reflected in the episode where a balance of 95 dollars saved from his foreign exchange permit of 200 dollars (having got converted 105 dollars into cash which eventually he was not permitted to travel with) saved his journey. Professor Singh himself, however, never believed in destiny but hard work only as revealed by him several times. At the University of Maryland his association with Dr Norman J. Doorenbos resulted in the initiation of research on synthetic steroids opening a vista for his life-long work on steroids of medicinal interest culminating in the discovery of chandonium iodide (candocuronium iodide), a drug.
Dr Singh’s joining the Department of Pharmacy (later rechristened as Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, followed by University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences) in May 1964 heralded an era where he spent rest of his life contributing enormously to scientific research, promoting pharmaceutical education, attending un-ending streams of official meetings and guiding the destiny of pharmacy profession in the country. Later, he developed a passion for writing history of pharmacy in India for which has very pains-takingly collected the literature which is a record in itself. Professor Singh has been a globe trotter and his travelogues are so vividly described that it takes the reader to the places. His most beneficial visit has been to the University of London where with the dint of his hard work he was able to impress Professor W.B. Whalley to the extent that the latter agreed to extend the facilities of analyses of the compounds his group synthesised at the Panjab University till the death of Professor Whalley in 2002.
Professor Singh has meticulously kept a chronicle of his research students and makes a mention of each of them in the book with the appreciation they deserve. It reflects the esteem and love he has for his pupils.
Professor Harkishan Singh, who currently enjoys the status of Professor Emeritus of Panjab University is an iconic figure, and has been a cut above the rest. His life itself has been an open book. The autobiography documents the events of his life which include both pleasant and some bitter but he always remained unruffled. His long career with uncountable contributions to the profession and his thought-provoking articles have earned him accolades. Some of his write-ups have provoked criticism as well. Harkishan Singh accepted accolades and criticism with the same sense of dignity. It will not be an over statement that his life is a model to others. The book is highly recommend to be read by all the professionals to draw inspiration.
The book is remarkably free from typographic mistakes (I could detect only one). The mis-recognition of a popular liquor band Vat69 as Vat1969 (page 191) speaks of his total teetotalism and abhorrence for alcoholic drinks.

 

*************************************************************************************************************************************

 

Reviewed By:- Dr. Saranjit Singh
I am not fond of reading biographies. But when a commemorative volume was issued in honour of my father, after reading the same, I realised how interesting it can be to know the life journey of a person you are so close, know so well or admire greatly. Several years back, I expressed to Professor Harkishan Singh, during one of my visits to his library at home, that it will be very nice if he could compile memoirs of his life as he is one of the living legends of pharmacy profession. He showed his reluctance, expressing that he had so much to write on topics related to professional history, and the same was his first priority. It was a surprise for me, when during a recent visit to him in his library, he showed me the manuscript of his memoirs in its final form, telling me that it was already in press and will be out soon. It was my great fortune to receive a signed copy from him in my office soon after.
I joined Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panjab University, as a student in July 1974, and it is for 40 years now that I have known Professor Singh, first as an esteemed and most respected teacher, and later as a mentor. I would not like to miss to share here a life changing personal advice by him to me: 'Society is a great leveler, you try to raise your head above the crowd, you get a bang and are forced to come to an equal level. It really needs a whole lot of courage and efforts to keep your head up above the rest and show to the world that you are different.' I took this Gurmantra seriously. After such a long association/ acquaintance, one can always say that I know this person very well, but after reading autobiography of Professor Singh word by word, I have no inhibition in saying that how little I have known of my teacher and revered Guru. The autobiography gives very interesting details about his childhood, struggles during his times and nice insight into his family life. By reading his memoirs, one gets a very vivid account of how this legend got to choose pharmacy as a career and how he was influenced by stalwarts of pharmacy profession in his formative years. Their influence made Professor Singh not only a scientist, researcher, educationist, pharmacy professional and later a recognized historian, but also a most disciplined person. It was a saying in our times that you can set your watch by keeping track of arrival and departure time of Professor Singh to the Department at the Panjab University. These days also, in capacity as a Professor Emeritus, he reaches the department sharp at 7.30 am, also in thick winter, at his advanced age of plus 85 years, to the surprise of every body. After two decades of his formal retirement, he keeps office-like timing even while working in his library at home. No doubt that he has been able to write so many volumes on history, which would never have been possible, otherwise, had he not maintained disciplined life. I must add here that Professor Singh hardly rewrites a sentence that he once pens down. May be one will find only a few corrections in the whole manuscript written by him in his hand. Such a nice God's gift.
As I was not his direct research student, I feel I missed a great opportunity to learn perfection as an experimentalist. Professor Singh has been a great experimenter himself.
Many times, the actions of a person, provided they are keenly observed, can leave a lifelong impression on others. Even it can change the way the other person lives the life. There is no preaching involved in this case. Once, in full summer afternoon, when the offices closed at 1.30 pm, by chance I was in the department post lunch, and happened to cross the office room of Professor Singh. It was unlocked and I thought the security person perhaps had forgotten to lock it. I took courage to peep in. And to my surprise Professor Singh was in his chair, with his shirt off, and also his turban removed and placed on the work table. His room had no room cooler or air conditioner and it must have been 40ºC outside. I quietly came out, without Professor Singh noticing my peeping, as he was fully engrossed in his study. I felt like saluting the person whose personal hard work had been unparalleled and greatly helped bring the department and Panjab University to such heights, that is currently recognised as among top institutes in the country. That kind of hard work by him continues even till date. In that manner, Professor Singh's way of life had been a silent lesson for me, and I am sure it must have been for others who have had a chance to interact with him.
What can be of interest to readers in Professor Singh's autobiography, is how, other than scientific pursuits leading to discovery of a new drug, a rare feat from University's labs, he has in general contributed in professional matters, and had shown vision in establishment of Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission, and National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, the latter with easy pronounceable Acronym ‘NIPER’, which was his idea. Again, I had an opportunity to work with him closely while planning for buildings of NIPER at its present campus in S.A.S. Nagar, and I really learnt how much deep and precise a person can be, when he guided even the size and type of the doors, the size of see-through glass on the doors, the type of knobs, locks, etc. His pursuit for quality was well highlighted from his insistence to select best and worthy faculty at NIPER, otherwise to keep the posts vacant. All such qualities of a person do not normally come out in an autobiography, as essentially the latter is a personal and factual account of journey of a person and his/her experiences during the lifetime.
That Professor Singh is a person with strong convictions and firm views, on which he never compromises, is well exemplified from reading different sections of his autobiography. Another salutation Professor Singh deserves is his connection with International Scientists in his research field and his zeal to visit the centres of learning throughout the world. I duly admire the great effort he made even at his personal cost in searching and collecting valuable historical material on pharmacy, which makes his collection a priceless asset for the profession. Professor Singh has covered all these aspects in detail in his memoir.
I strongly recommend reading of this lucid account of Professor Harkishan Singh's life journey by each and every pharmacy professional in the country. I suggest the readers not only to enjoy the narrative, but list and imbibe the lessons ingrained in the writing.
This book deserves to be on the shelves of libraries all over.
 

Pages 332

 

 

 
 

Title

: Views And Reviews 2

Author

: Professor Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Association of Pharmaceutical Teachers of India, Bangalore
 

Professor Harkishan Singh, Professor Emeritus, Panjab University, Chandigarh, is a prominent medicinal chemist and a pharmaceutical historian of international repute. He has explored the pharmaceutical history of India covering the span of last few centuries including the pharmaceutical progress in independent India. He has published a number of books on this subject which are highly interesting to read.
For the past fifty years, Prof. Singh has continued to give expression to his views that are both informative and inspiring, at times nonconforming and provocative, besides which he presented reviews on assorted topics which were educative and always directed towards the good of pharmacy profession. He also wrote on the basis of his personal and social experiences. The Association of Pharmaceutical Teachers of India (APTI), Bangalore, undertook to publish a collection of his 101 articles which have appeared in different pharmaceuticals journals during the period 1954-2007. This compilation is published in the form of a book Views and Reviews, now designated Views and Reviews 1, (2008). The material presented largely pertained to pharmaceutical education and research, pharmacy practice, industry, trade, statutory control on drugs and pharmacy, colonial medicine and pharmacy, pharmaceutical journals and biographies of pharmaceutical luminaries. There was also included narration of sagas of several struggles by the profession. The publication of this book has become a tome of its own kind on historical perspectives. There were many articles with direct focus on the pharmaceutical history theme. Also worth noting were the views when expressed during the preceding decades were of topical interest but with time became a part of the history of the respective achievements of the profession in reaching projected goals.
Favourable comments were given by competent reviewers on Views and Reviews 1. This encouraged Prof. Singh to continue to write on the subject and further compile his writings, mostly published in different journals in chronological order from 2008- 2011, which has now been published in the form of a book Views and Reviews 2.
The author has covered in this book topics like National Formulary of India (NFI), and its publication as 1960, 1966 and 1979 editions and then later there were no more editions. He emphasises the importance of British National Formulary (BNF) in British medical profession and suggests similar standards for Indian pharmacy as well. Yet, in another article, the author has given a detailed account of the history of modern pharmacy in India and mentions the works of leading pioneers of modern pharmacy and pharmacy education in India.
In one another article Prof. Singh has given his views of the platinum jubilee celebration of Indian Pharmaceutical Association, should it be 1910 or 1915? He suggests 1910. Then he gives clear historical perspective of pharmaceutical education and pharmacy practice. In another articles he gives a very interesting brief description on pharmaceutical heritage. A short note in some articles like “We and our Students” and”Guru and Shishya, Schroff and Srivastav” and “My Country, My Beloved” make interesting readings.
The last article in this book volume was an invited lecture given by Prof. Singh at the workshop on “Science in India in the 20th century„ sponsored by Asiatic Society, Kolkata, 8 March 2011, where interesting description of the pharmaceutical developments during the British period and in independent India was presented. The author covers the beginning of the Portuguese medicine in India, followed by British period of pharmacopoeias and then pharmacopoeias of independent India and mentions the formation of various Indian Pharmacopoeia Committee.
Following Indian tradition Prof. Singh has been devoted and loyal to his Gurus and contemporaries, as well to scientists and educators and industrialists who laid the foundation of pharmacy education and drug industry in India. In meticulously research articles, he has described the life and works of Ram Nath Chopra( 1882-1973), Khem Singh Grewal(1894-1965), Manohar Lal Khorana(1909-1967), Ratilal Prabuhdas Patel(1909-1978), Homi Ruttonji Nanji(1909-1967), Bishnupada Mukerji(1903-1979), Mahadeva Lal Schroff(1902-1971), Tribhovandas Kalyandas Gajjar(1863-1920), Khwaja Abdul Hamied(1898-1972), Charles W. White and Walter White(1862-1938), Harry Cooper(1888-1935), Sankatha Prasad(1911-1986), Kidar Nath Gaind(1911-1977), Upendra Nath Brahmachari, Prafulla Chandra Ray( 1861-1944), Shridhar Kotibhaskar, and Bhailal D. Amin. In another article of this book, Prof Singh has described the life and works of Professor William Basil Whalley((1916-2002) with whom he had the honour to work in the School of Pharmacy , University of London for an academic year(1971-1972).
This book is nicely complied and contains a lot of interesting documents with historical pictures. Author has dedicated the book to his grandchildren, a lovely coloured photograph of kids with grandfather (1998). Prof. Singh has done a great service to the profession of pharmacy in India by compiling the articles from 2008-2011 and thus completed the whole period of his writings from 1954 up to 2011. Views and Reviews 2 like Views and Reviews 1 is an extraordinary contribution to pharmaceutical history of India. It is a fascinating story narrated by a learned and distinguished teacher, researcher, historian whose statements are backed by due references and data. This book is highly recommended for students of pharmacy and medicine, to all the pharmaceutical and drug professionals in the universities and industries, besides that, to all pharmaceutical and medical authorities in India.
 

Book Reviewed by: Dr. Ravindernath Kaul, Germany
Price: Rs 550/- Pages 300
 

 

 

     
 

Title

: Memoirs: Distinguished Alumni of SMS

Author

: Prof. P. C. Dandiya & Dr. Rohit Dandiya

Publishers

: Jaipur printers Pvt. Ltd.
 

Sir Mirza Ismail, the Prime Minister of the princely state of Jaipur conceived the idea of establishing a medical college in the pink city of Jaipur in 1945. Before it could become a reality two things happened, firstly Sir Ismail moved to Hyderabad to become Prime Minister under Nizam’s rule and secondly, soon India was to become independent nation. However, the idea was realized as the Maharaja Sawai Man Singh, the ruler of the princely state established the college in 1947 which was named after him. The Sawai Man Singh (S.M.S.) Medical College, Jaipur was to become the first Medical College to be established in independent India. Then it was one of the few medical colleges in the country. As it stands today, the college is 67 year old. It has grown from just 5 departments and 30 teachers and 180 students in 1947 to almost 50 departments (in almost all clinical specialty), 560 teachers (140 full professors) and nearly 1600 (UG & PG) students. The outpatient attendance has gone to a staggering number.
Growth of any institution and maintaining reputation of quality teaching and clinical practice depended on several factors, more so in government sector. As the institutions grow old, the alumni become important brand ambassadors for the institutions. It is equally important for the alumni to pay back to their alma mater in terms of sharing their rich experiences and even reinforcing facilities in their alma mater. The SMS Medical College proudly has all these components in abundance. Its founding fathers were stalwarts like Col. R.M. Kasliwal, Dr L.R. Sarin, Sanghavi, P.K.Sethi, G.C.Sharma, Rameshwar Sharma and many others. Dr Robert Heilig, a physician who came to India from Austria and dedicated his life in building the medical library. Because of his monumental efforts that today the college has an independent library in his name.
All this has happened in these 67 years and there is one individual who is a witness to SMS history and himself has immensely contributed to the glory of the institution. He is none other than legendary and charismatic Professor Prem Chand Dandiya, who joined the institute in its infancy in 1949 and continues to serve and teach (65 years!) even today as Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology.
The book, ‘‘Memoirs: Distinguished alumni of SMS’ is Professor Dandiya’s brain child. It covers the memoirs of some 100 illustrious alumni who have walked through corridors of this temple of medical learning called ‘SMS’ and serving the society across the globe in different capacities. Many serve as physicians to the President and the Medical Council of India. The list is long but to name a few are: Cardiologist Professor B.K.Goyal, Dr Jagat Narula, Dr L.Jain, Hepatologist Professor Shiv Sarin, Dr Shridhar Sharma and many. The book has been elegantly brought out as coffee table reader. The efforts of both Professor Dandiya and Dr Rohit Dandiya are commended. Many institutions may like to emulate the idea. The book is recommended for the institutional libraries. The classy publication by Jaipur printers, Jaipur is praiseworthy.

 

Book Reviewed By: Prof. S. K. Kulkarni
Price: Rs.4995/-
Pages: 208

 

 

     
 

Title

: Sickle Cell Pain, Second Edition

Author

: Samir K. Ballas

Publishers

 

Sickle Cell Pain is a panoramic, in-depth exploration of every scientific, human, and social dimension of this cruel disease. This comprehensive, definitive work is unique in that it is the only book devoted to sickle cell pain, as opposed to general aspects of the disease.
The 752 page book links sickle cell pain to basic, clinical, and translational research, addressing various aspects of sickle pain from molecular biology to the psychosocial aspects of the disease.
Supplemented with patient narratives, case studies, and visual art, Sickle Cell Pain’s scientific rigor extends through its discussion of analgesic pharmacology, including abuse-deterrent formulations. The book also addresses in great detail inequities in access to care, stereotyping and stigmatization of patients, the implications of rapidly evolving models of care, and recent legislation and litigation and their consequences.

 
Price: $185.00
Pages: 752

 

 

     
 

 

Witness to An Era: An Autobiography of Professor Harkishan Singh

 

New Delhi: Prof. S. N. Sharma hosted a lunch to honor Prof. Harkishan Singh on his being awarded Honorary Doctorate in Science by University of the Science, Philadelphia, USA. The occasion was also used to informally release the autobiography of Prof. Harkishan Singh titled "Witness to an era".
Professor Harkishan Singh, presently Emeritus Professor at the Punjab University (Chandigarh, India), is a well recognized pharmaceutical academic, medicinal chemistry researcher and a science historian. He was born on 25th Nov, 1928 in Lyallpur District of undivided Punjab, India. The autobiography contains vivid account from Author's humble beginning, education in pharmacy obtaining Master's, Doctoral degrees from Banaras Hindu University and Post-doctoral fellowship at University of Maryland under Dr. Francis M. Miller and Dr. Norman J Doorenbos, his work at premiere Universities in India and equal number abroad and as a scientist and researcher leading to discovery of Chandonium Iodide, a heterosteroidal neuromuscular blocking agent. An Important phase came after his supperannuation when he chose to become a science historian and trace history of pharmaceutical development in India. Now, for more than two decades, continuing his history research he has authored 18 books in organic, basic and pharmaceutical practical chemistry, medicinal research and history of pharmacy in its various facets. The autobiography also contains details of his contributions, his friends, his archival work and much more. The autobiography covers vivid account of events as they occurred in his life. A particular mention of his parents and poignant moments with his wife Gian and children Tript and Manjeet.
Prof. P. C. Dandiya's feeback on the book: "I feel very complemented having received the "Witness to an Era". You are a very prolific writer who has written many books and now that you have written the story of your life. I admire you immensely for this new venture. I have only read the first 100 pages and this I have done in two days time since the way you have written about your childhood and have described the village life in Punjab in the 1930s and 40s made it very interesting and absorbing. Your capacity to describe the intimate details of your family in such a simple yet dignified manner is very admirable. For me, the road you traveled through at the Banaras Hindu University was a very familiar one and therefore I have enjoyed reading every word of it having done that a few years before you and again almost after 30 years you did it. This I am writing to you now but after having read the whole book I hope to write to you more on what you write about the Era."
The autobiography is a must read for all those associated with the profession of pharmacy and pharmaceutical research. The pharmaceutical faculty is requested to have a copy of the autobiography made available at the major libraries for the benefit of the younger generation. I congratulate Prof. Harkishan Singh and Vallabh Prakashan for this invaluable publication.

  

 

     
 

Title

: Sickle Cell Pain, Second Edition

Author

: Samir K. Ballas

Publishers

 

Sickle Cell Pain is a panoramic, in-depth exploration of every scientific, human, and social dimension of this cruel disease. This comprehensive, definitive work is unique in that it is the only book devoted to sickle cell pain, as opposed to general aspects of the disease.
The 752 page book links sickle cell pain to basic, clinical, and translational research, addressing various aspects of sickle pain from molecular biology to the psychosocial aspects of the disease.
Supplemented with patient narratives, case studies, and visual art, Sickle Cell Pain’s scientific rigor extends through its discussion of analgesic pharmacology, including abuse-deterrent formulations. The book also addresses in great detail inequities in access to care, stereotyping and stigmatization of patients, the implications of rapidly evolving models of care, and recent legislation and litigation and their consequences.

 
Price: $185.00
Pages: 752

 

 

     
 

Title

: WITNESS to an Era

Author

: Professor Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, Delhi
 

Professor Harkishan Singh, Professor Emeritus, Punjab University, Chandigarh, is a senior member of the pharmaceutical fraternity, a distinguished academic, an outstanding medicinal chemist, an active participant in the growth and consolidation of the pharmacy profession in India and a pharmaceutical historian of international standing. Reviews of his works and recognitions have been published in many journals in India and abroad. The latest honour was the conferment of the honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the University of Sciences in Philadelphia, PA (USA) on 20 February 2014. Recently, Prof. Singh has published his autobiography Witness to an Era, describing the events of his life from his childhood to the present time (he is now 85 years of age), covered in detail in 148 sections of this book.
Born in village Khara, district Tarn Taran (Punjab), he narrates events from his early life, talks of his parents, and above all, of life in villages in the twenties of the last century. All in all, his account makes very interesting reading not only for today’s youth but also for future generations. He had his schooling in Gurdaspur and Tarn Taran and college education in Lahore till 1947. He describes the glory of Lahore, which was a cultural and education centre of Punjab. Due to the traumatic event of the partition of India and Punjab he left Lahore and continued his intermediate studies in Amritsar, the holy city of the Sikhs. In spite of the trauma of the partition which affected him deeply, he was able to qualify for B. Pharm. in 1950 with top marks from the newly created East Panjab University. This was followed by a period of practical training at Drug Research Laboratories, Jammu where Sir Ram Nath Chopra was the Director. He then pursued his further studies, completing his M. Pharm. in 1952 and his Ph. D in 1956 from Banaras Hindu University (BHU). He mentions explicitly that his life and career were guided by N.K. Basu und G.P. Srivastava with both of whom he had a deep association at BHU.
Prof. Singh describes his career as a member of the faculty at BHU (1952-1956), later at the University of Saugar (1956-1964), finally settling down at the Panjab University, Chandigarh (1964-1988), where he then rose to be a Professor in 1972, and also held other important positions. He gives a detailed account of his studies abroad as postdoctoral research fellow and Visiting Professor at Universities of Maryland (USA), Mississippi (USA) and London (UK). He worked with Norman J. Doorenbos (USA) and William B. Whalley (UK) about whom he often speaks in different sections of this book. He also mentions his association with John M. Midgley, University of London (UK).
Prof. Singh writes in one of the sections about the celebration of his marriage in 1958 at Amritsar. In the next sections, he describes in detail his first journey for research studies to USA by sea in 1958 with his wife soon after marriage, and speaks especially of the difficulties which arose while completing the formalities. However, the adventures of this journey make for enjoyable reading, especially the contacts he made while on board the ship.
At the Panjab University, he built a successful school of research on azasteroids, a prominent highlight of the work of his research group being the discovery of muscle relaxant Chandonium Iodide. The development and the clinical tests of this drug are detailed in many sections of this book, describing collaborations with Ian G. Marshall, University of Strathclyde (UK), Sandor Agoston, University of Groningen (Netherlands), Rex A. Palmer, University of London (UK) as well as with Nitya Anand and B.N. Dhawan, of the Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow (India). In many sections of the book, Prof. Singh writes gratefully of the work of his research students, their dedication, hard work and honesty, which also contributed to his rise.
Prof. Singh has lectured extensively on azasteriods and Chandonium Iodide in India, USA, Canada, UK, China, Switzerland, and all itineraries of his travel and lectures are mentioned in detail in this book. In spite of his busy schedule in these countries, he took time for sightseeing and visiting museums and places of historical interest, of which very interesting descriptions are given in the book. He especially brings to the readers’ attention scientific lectures, tours and trips, some of which were also organised and planned by his students, colleagues or friends from India who are now settled in USA and Canada. He mentions with respect their great hospitality, and the trouble they took to make his stay comfortable at these places. Some even organised get-togethers and parties, the accounts of which he relates extensively.
In many sections of this book he writes about research programmes and teachings of the Department of Pharmacy, Chandigarh which has attained an enviable reputation and was designated as University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS) and got the status of Centre of Advanced Study. A number of pharmaceutical congresses and seminars have been held in the department for the last 40 years. Prof. Singh has been associated with the working of several professional and statutory organisations of India.
Prof. Singh gives details regarding the creation of the Central Institute of Pharmacy, the idea being originally conceived by M.L. Schroff. It was a long struggle which ultimately led to the establishment of the National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER) at Mohali (Punjab). The engaging details of this journey, its establishment and academic structuring are described in many sections of this book, very interesting to read.
Prof. Singh mentions in his autobiography, the influence of his parents (to whom this book is dedicated) on his life, especially that of his father. But behind the success in his scientific career, he warmly mentions, was his great and noble wife Gian to whom he was happily married for 40 years. She accompanied him on many trips abroad but often had to stay behind at home to take care of their children and his parents. He dedicates two sections to her and describes her wonderful qualities, and writes about her health problems with great feeling, finally speaking of her tragic death at Ambala Cantt. Station, in 1998 which had a great impact not only on him but also on their two children Manjeet and Tript. In spite of this tragedy he continued to work tirelessly on his lifelong mission of exploring the history of pharmaceutical developments in India during the last two centuries, which work he had started after his superannuation in 1988. All his work and archival collection, books and book reviews are well covered in this autobiography.
My personal association with Prof. Singh goes back to 1961 at Saugar University and this contact remains till today. As a humble scientist it is my pleasure to write about the wonderful contributions Prof. Singh has made to the history of Pharmacy, which is a treasure not only for the future generations but also to the country. My wife Durga and I are overwhelmed by this great honour he has given us by mentioning us in his memoir.
This book is extremely well-written and interesting to read. Appendix at end of the book gives personal particulars of Prof. Singh. The print and compilation are excellent. It should be recommended to all educational communities of India as an eye-opener to the younger generations, who must know how, as a young man Prof. Harkishan Singh started from scratch, with little financial means and faced with the trauma of partition of Punjab in 1947, but with hard work and sheer honesty, he has set a living example by achieving his leading position in pharmacy profession in India. As an admirer of President John F. Kennedy, whom he has quoted (p. 115) “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country”. Prof. Singh has never asked, but has contributed tremendously to the pharmacy profession of India of which we all should be proud. This book is worthy of being a part of all the big and important libraries of India.

 
Price: Rs.600
Pages: 322

 

 

     
 

Title

: Pharmaceutical Facility Management

Author

: JPS Kohli

Publishers

: Business Horizons, New Delhi
 

This is the successor to an already well received and pioneering book that has been completely brought uptodate with the current international standards.
While the earlier edition was all about smooth and trouble free working of a pharmaceutical facility, the new second edition strives to achieve excellence and set industry benchmarks for facilities of the future. The pharmaceutical facilities of today must reach out beyond the routine and strive for excellence in all spheres of activity, to enable the company retain its competitive edge in the marketplace. To put the facility manager firmly in control of the entire facility, a new chapter has been created specifically to focus on facility manager and the roles and responsibilities that compose the job description of this position. The contents of this section include Role of a Facility Manager, Financial Management, Facilities Condition Assessment (Audit), Pharmaceutical Facility Validation, Facility Design Qualification, Facility Installation Qualification, Facility Operational Qualification, Utility Systems and Safety for Facility Management.
Social responsibility towards the planet we inhabit has been recognized as our unfailing duty and ways to sustain the ecosystem are constantly being evolved. Since pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities impose lots of demands on the physical environment in which they exist, innovative companies are always trying to lessen their carbon footprint through various methodologies being evolved. What is today seen as innovation will perhaps become mandatory in the near future and hence a new chapter has been introduced called ‘Sustainable Facilities’ that suggests various means by which a company can reduce its carbon footprint. The contents of this section include Ecosystems, Sustainable Manufacturing, Current Scenario, Green Chemistry, Process Mass Intensity, Green Solvents, Green Engineering, Sustainable Buildings, Sustainable Energy Management, Cleanrooms (HVAC), Facility Lighting, Electric Motors, Compressed Air, Boilers and Sustainable Water Management.
The most exciting change however in the new edition is the introduction of a new chapter, ‘Operational Excellence in Pharma Manufacturing’ which focuses on manufacturing efficiency for the first time, focusing on actual shop floor strategies rather than arcane management fuzzy logic formulas. While current efficiency levels in the pharmaceutical industry are examined, avenues for excellence are explored that include continuous processing of pharmaceuticals, automated manufacturing, optimizing batch sizes and cycle times and overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). A company can thus develop its own corporate manufacturing strategy based on the technology level it is willing to upgrade to, market and business demands and the resources required for such project. The contents of this section include Focus on Manufacturing Efficiency, Current Efficiency Levels, Continuous Processing of Pharmaceuticals, Automated Manufacturing, Good Automated Manufacturing Practices (GAMP), ASTM E2500, Optimizing Batch Sizes and Cycle Times, Overall Equipment Effectiveness and Corporate Manufacturing Strategy.
All other chapters have been thoroughly overhauled, outdated information removed and current and up-to-date information included to transform the existing chapters to cutting edge contemporary standards.
The author JPS Kohli is a pharmacy graduate from University of Delhi followed by Diploma in Management of Technology Transfer, Patents and Information Systems. He has wide ranging experience in the pharmaceutical industry, having worked in a pharmaceutical engineering company followed by working in a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility as Manager-Projects and Exports. He is a member of Indian Pharmaceutical Association (IPA), International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineers (ISPE), American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS), Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Sciences Society (PHSS) and International Federation of Pharmaceuticals (FIP). He is included in Who’s Who in the field of Science and Engineering. He has travelled extensively and visited/audited the manufacturing plants of many companies. He now heads the firm Business Horizons that specializes in books on pharmaceuticals and herbal medicines with an emphasis on technical and quality aspects.
Over 25 years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry, is easily reflected in this unique book. These chapters give an unparalleled approach to managing today’s pharmaceutical facilities. The high standard of the chapters makes it an essential reference guide that should be on the shelf of everyone who is involved in managing modern pharmaceutical facilities.

 
Price: Rs.3400
Pages: 424

 

 

     
 

Title

: Exploring Nanotechnology in Healthcare

Author

: N Udupa

Publishers

: Manipal University Press
 

Exploring Nanotechnology in Healthcare is a reference book written with the intention of providing information to the readers regarding various facets of nanotechnology in healthcare. There are a total of fifteen chapters in the book to name a few Nanochemistry, Applications of nanotechnology in healthcare, nanotherapy, nanotechnology in infectious diseases, nanotoxicity, impact of nanotechnology on Indian economy, Global initiatives and regulations of nanotechnology based products etc.,

 
Introduction chapter gives an overview of nanotechnology perspectives. Characterization methods chapter enlists and explain the various techniques with their pros and cons for characterizing physicochemical properties of nanoparticles.

 
This book describes various materials used in the development of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, diverse types of nanoproducts that may be formulated and used for effective therapy, their preparation methods, as well as various frontiers of applications. This book may be considered unique as it incorporated aspects of nanochemistry which is a documentation of discovering and understanding new behavior exhibited by matter at nano dimensions and to develop them into useful things such as efficient drug delivery systems, ultrasensitive sensors, ultra-lightweight structural materials, highly efficient alternative energy sources or as new materials for an entirely new application. Nanochemistry utilizes synthetic and green chemistry approaches to make nanosize materials of desirable dimensions by controlled self-assembly of these building blocks. Nanotechnology and environments explicates the origin and distribution of natural nanoparticles that influence our day to day life causing useful as well as harmful effects. This chapter also deal with using nanotechnology mediated alternative energy systems for "green" manufacturing processes and cautions the readers about the requisite for proper measures to control and prevent their release into environment. As the particle size decreases, the increase in surface area lead to increased reactivity in the cellular environment leading to increased intrinsic toxicity. It is detected that among the various biological systems, intense toxicity of nano sized particles are more evidenced in blood, CNS, GIT Respiratory and skin. Hence, though a large quantum of research is happening across the globe on potential use of nanoparticles in medicine, a complete profile of its pharmacokinetics and toxicity is lacking. Nanotechnology is a potential tool in which addresses various sectors like energy, water, agriculture, health, environment etc.

 
Nanotechnology also has a significant influence on world's economy and market volume. It is capable of providing solutions to the existing problems, without creating a new problem. The two major issues are associated with research and development of nanotechnology based products. First and most important issue is potential threat that nanotechnology may impose to human health and environment. Second one is broader which includes ethical, legal and social impacts of nanotechnology. Hence, this book gives a complete profiling of various areas improved and inflicted by nanotechnology and highlights the necessity of adopting nanotechnology based therapeutics for improving the efficacy and patient compliance.

 
Reviewed By: Dr M Surlivel Rajan and Dr Sreedharan Nair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
Pages: 230

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Title

: Law Relating to Drugs and Cosmetics

Author

: Vijay Malik

Publishers

: Eastern Book Company, Lucknow
 

The Law Relating to Drugs and Cosmetics is continuously evolving. This 23rd edition of the book is an authentic and up-to-date source of information in this very important field. It covers fully amended Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 and the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules, 1945 as amended upto the Third Amendment Rules, 2013, along with new case-law notes, allied Acts, Rules, Orders and Notifications.

 
To enhance the utility of this publication, fresh new material has been added in this edition that includes Drugs (Prices Control) Order, 2013; Clinical Establishments (Central Government) Rules, 2012; National Pharmaceuticals Pricing Policy, 2012; Cost Accounting Records (Pharmaceutical Industry) Rules, 2011; Guidelines on Registration of Import of Cosmetics and Important Circulars issued by CDSCO; List of Drugs approved during January 2006 to April 2013 etc. Furthermore Elizabeth Verkey's chapter on Patents and Pharmaceuticals has been updated to incorporate the effect of the Novartis judgment of the Supreme Court.

 
This new edition comes with free CD-ROM, featuring regulations regarding clinical trials, IV Fluids, Recall and Rapid Alert System for Drugs; directory of Equipment Manufacturers, Phytochemicals; sources of Medicinal Herbs in India etc. Additionally, free online updates are available at www.ebcwebstore.com/drugsandcosmetics  only to purchaser of the book.

 
Since, all practices of medicine such as Allopathic, Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha are covered under the drug control law therefore this book is equally important for all these disciplines. Overall, this dependable and time-honored work is imperative and much-needed resource for all pharmaceutical manufacturers and sellers, foreign companies wanting to invest in this sector in India, blood banks, hospitals and medical practitioners, lawyers and law firms.

 

 
 

Title

: Sethi's HPTLC - Quantitative Analysis of Pharmaceutical Formulations

Author

: Dr. P. D. Sethi

Publishers

: CBS Publishers & Distributors, New Delhi.
 

The three-volume set by the author on quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations by HPTLC (2013) is published in quick succession to a four-volume enlarged and revised edition (2012) on quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations with description of reaction mechanisms. This highlights the continued zeal of the author to offer scientific inputs and compilations to fellow pharmaceutical analysts, ignoring his advancing age. A more so admirable aspect is that he has been able to bring such voluminous treatises even without the support of computer, internet, e-mail, etc., unimaginable by anyone in the modern times.

 
This fresh set contains 10 chapters in total, of which first two cover general aspects (introduction and validation of HPTLC methods) and the remaining eight describe detailed HPTLC protocols and densitograms for the separation of drugs used in combinations for the therapy of diseases of cardiovascular system; musculoskeletal system; antibiotics; respiratory system and anti-allergics; alimentary system; central nervous system, preparations for external use, and miscellaneous.

 
The first chapter covering Introduction is 116 pages long and covers basics of HPTLC techniques and instrumentation, conduct of experiments, and even provides practical tips. An elaborate second chapter on validation of HPTLC methods is contributed by team of Dr Nitin Dubey, Dr. Nidhi Dubey and Dr DK Jain from Indore. Both these chapters are full of information and must be read through by every analyst working on HPTLC. I will advise their reading even by those handling other techniques.

 
The next eight chapters give 528 protocols for the effective separation of drugs in variety of combinations and formulations. A very large number of protocols are picked up from the literature, and the author rightly advises the user to be vigilant on their reproducibility and accuracy of validation claims. The protocols developed/optimized at Anchrom’s HPTLC Application Laboratory, Mumbai are seemingly original and may not be reported previously. So these add a real value to the compilation.

 
On the whole, it is a great effort from the author. This set will prove very valuable for analysts, especially those involved in the analysis of drug combinations in private and regulatory laboratories, both in India and abroad.

 

Book Reviewed By: Dr Saranjit Singh

Author: Dr. P. D. Sethi

Published By: CBS Publishers & Distributors, New Delhi.

 

 

 

Title

: A Professor Remembers Some more

Author

: Professor P.C. Dandiya

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, New Delhi
 

Generally the memoirs are written once in a life time. Perhaps in rare individuals where life is so enriching that everyday becomes an enduring event which calls for ‘some more’ to share with others. That is so with the iconic Professor, Dr Prem Chand Dandiya who has penned his experiences of life (156 additional pages more!) to his earlier autobiography. Eighteen new chapters are about the events, individuals, places, medicines and the teaching of them. The first chapter, ‘The last letter’ addressed to his loving wife, ‘Meena’ (who is no more) he talks about of his life in her absence, growing up of granddaughter, their love and affection. The events and the narrations are natural and heart rendering. The other descriptions on ‘The women I value’, ‘Sapna and the Bengalis of Cooch Behar’, ‘Robert Heilig’, ‘why I love Jaipur’ and ‘The Jain Religion’ are life experiences of the man and equally make absorbing reading.

 
Dr Dandiya has extensively travelled across the globe. He writes about his recent visits to two neighbouring countries, namely China and Pakistan. He cherishes his visit to China and the honour that he received from the Chinese Pharmacological Society. But his visit to Lahore and the experience of meeting two schoolmates after 60 years tell how ethos have changed the destiny of two countries after the sad partition.
Professor Dandiya is associated with teaching of Pharmacology to medical students for nearly 62 years (almost 3 generation) which is very rare and therefore, he makes a case for ‘Ten drugs that changed our lives’. Looking back, the whole modern drug industry has taken the present shape in these years only. Being a voracious reader himself, he advocates reading classics and biographies of well-known individuals and how reading influences one’s life. At a time when reading habit is dwindling in our youngsters, he makes an important case for good books.

 
The narrations in the book are very unique and captivating. The volume is elegantly brought about. The “A Professor Remembers-Some more” would make an interesting reading companion and value addition to your library.

 

Book Reviewed By: Prof. S.K. Kulkarni

Author: Professor P.C. Dandiya

Published By: Vallabh Prakashan, New Delhi

 

 

 

Title

: Sethi's HPTLC - Quantitative Analysis of Pharmaceutical Formulations

Author

: Dr. P. D. Sethi

Publishers

: CBS Publishers & Distributors, New Delhi
 

Dr P. D. Sethi’s latest book titled “Sethi’s  High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography, Quantitative Analysis of Pharmaceutical Formulations” is beautifully presented in three volumes containing close to 1300 pages of crisp, practical and useful information on the topic.

The first volume provides a comprehensive introduction to the technique, including details on types of layers used, different types of support surfaces and practical tips on preparing samples, sample application, as well as various factors which influence the performance of a HPTLC analysis. Dr Sethi has shared a rare insight to his life and professional career in the section titled “Making of An Analyst and The Author” sharing details of his journey on how he became an analyst and the author of a number of bestselling books in the field of pharmaceutical analysis. The take-home message from this section for me is very clearly given as the quote at the end of the section.

“No one is ever born talented nor talent obtained as a gift or lucky coincidence. It is a resource acquired through one’s own endeavor, in this process, others may provide some help, inspiration and guidance.” After the introduction, the first volume provides a detailed coverage on validation of HPTLC methods, including practical examples and strategies for validation of HPTLC methods.

The book contains 528 protocols for the HPTLC analysis of pharmaceutical formulations, putting to rest any doubts or questions on the applicability of HPTLC in the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation. Each protocol provides the following details-

·         Preparation of samples,

·         preparation of standards,

·         the chromatographic equipment used,

·        parameters for densitometric evaluation, chromatographic conditions, including stationary phase, mobile phase, standard and sample application,

         chamber saturation, relative humidity, quantity of mobile phase, temperature, migration distance and other critical parameters,

·         references to the original publication or source for the method,

·         comments on the extent of validation or any comparative study which has been carried out for the method,

·         a typical densitogram,

·         structures of the compounds analysed,

·         overlaid UV spectra of compounds analysed for selection of suitable wavelength for densitrometric scanning.

 

The details provided for each protocol are sufficient for reproducing the methods in the laboratory.

The contents of the introduction itself are of immense value to anyone using HPTLC or simple TLC in the laboratory. Both beginners and experienced practitioners of thin layer chromatography stand to gain from the practical information presented in the introduction. The practical tips provided at the end of introduction should help the analyst to be a better chromatographer. I would highly recommend this book to any individual or organisation currently using or planning to use high-performance thin-layer chromatography in the analysis of pharmaceutical formulations.

 

Book Reviewed By: Sourabh Arora, M.Pharm.,Ph.D.

Author: Dr. P. D. Sethi

Published By: CBS Publishers & Distributors, New Delhi.

 

 

 

Title

: How To Practice GLP

Author

: P. P. Sharma

Publishers

: Vandana Publications Pvt. Ltd., Delhi.

 

When the first edition of this book was published, there was no formal or informal text of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) from the regulatory authority in India. Therefore, the guidelines appearing under the US FDA GLP were the basis for the 3rd Edition guidelines in the first edition of this book. Some developments have taken place since then. A sub-committee of the Drugs Consultative Committee brought out the guidelines for GLP. These guidelines were published by the Central Drug Standards Control Organizations (CDSCO). Latter, the Government of India published draft rules incorporating Schedule L-1 under the Drugs & Cosmetics Rules. These drafts rules were made the basis of discussion in the second edition of this book along with OECD and US FDA GLP.
The Government of India, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare published final amendment to the drugs & Cosmetics Rules in November 2008 with stipulation that the provisions of the amendment will be effective from 1st November, 2010. Since, these amendments are now part of the Drugs & Cosmetics Rules, the basis of discussion of GLP guidelines in this edition is based on Schedule L-1. However, wherever necessary, a reference to similarity or otherwise has also been made to the OECD or US FDA GLP guidelines.
At one time, it was being contemplated by the CDSCO that NABL accreditation will be made mandatory to the drug testing laboratories in India. But it has not been done so far.
There are certain procurement agencies for drugs which get their samples tested at drug testing laboratories. These agencies insist that drug testing laboratories should be NABL accredited. Therefore, a chapter has been added on NABL accreditation.
OECD countries require safety data on chemicals, drugs, cosmetics, veterinary drugs, food additives etc. from OECD GLP complaint testing laboratories, if such items are imported into those countries. The Government of India, Ministry of Science & Technology, has established the National GLP Compliance Monitoring Authority under the aegis of Department of Sciences & Technology. This authority issues GLP compliance certificate for the compliance of OECD GLP principles. Therefore, a chapter has been added on GLP certification. This will be useful to those drug manufacturers which export drugs to the OECD countries.
On technical side, calibration and qualification of instruments is very important. Reliable and consistent analytical data can not be obtained without these activities. Therefore, a chapter has been added on calibration and qualification of analytical instruments.
The book will be useful to quality control chemists, QA personnel, regulatory officers, pharmacy faculty, students and consultants.
Book Review By: Dr. P. D. Sethi.
Author: P. P. Shrama
Publishers: Vandana Publications Pvt. Ltd., Delhi.

 

 

 

 

Title

: Pharmaceutical Anti – Counterfeiting

Author

 

Publishers

 

 

Drug counterfeiting is not a new phenomenon for this industry. The book Pharmaceutical Counterfeiting by mark Division may not be the first one to examine the menace of drug counterfeiting, but is the first to provide a comprehensive guide on the currently available anti – counterfeiting technologies and the possible solutions to combat the problem. The author, Mark Davisonis himself a renowned pharmaceutical consultant and his currently the CEO of Blue Sphere Health Ltd. Davison has a great deal of industry experience in pharmaceutical as well as product security and hence has written this book after careful research and insight into the industry and its problems. It is very likely for the industry professionals to appreciate the author’s ability on categorically addressing the issues like drug counterfeiting, current authentication and taking technologies, future approaches and examples on drug counterfeiting from around the world. His discussions on future policy / authentication technologies hold a promise to be useful for policy makers and drug companies as he emphases on the need of integration of both digital and non – digital (physical and sensory) authentication methods for pharmaceutical companies. In the book he has also suggested the policy makers to think on focusing over health and patient protection rather than handling and defining IP issues and legal definitions. The book also examines the micro and macro drives, government involvements, geographical and regional issues, and consumer behavior along with practices in some other industries. However, it would have been even better if the author had highlighted some of industry’s best practices adopted by various pharmaceutical companies besides giving a comparison of authentication technologies in terms of their strengths, weakness, usages etc. Perhaps a future edition on these pointers will do even well with the readers. For those determined to take an action against counterfeit pharmaceutical and healthcare products, will find the book useful.

 

 

 

Title

: Editing Pharmacy

Author

: Professor Bhagwan Dass Miglani

Publishers

: Association of Pharmaceutical Teachers of India (APTI); Bangalore 2011.

 

Professor Bhagwan Dass Miglani can be truly called as Father of Hospital Pharmacy in India. Perhaps no other pharmaceutical professional in the country has done so much of work for upgrading the discipline of Hospital Pharmacy as Miglani Sahib. He is an architect of the development of Hospital Pharmacy in India.
As compared to Western countries, Pharmacy Practice in general and Hospital Pharmacy in particular was in a rather underdeveloped state before independence and even in the initial years of independent India. The tireless efforts and devotion of Dr. Miglani for this profession in post- independence period are praiseworthy and highly commendable. He founded the Indian Hospital Pharmacists’ Association (IHPA) in 1963 at the Indian Pharmaceutical Conference in Pilani, holding the positions of General Secretary (1964 -1971) and President (1972 -1973) and is rightly the Patron of the Association at present. He founded the Indian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy (IJHP) in 1964 as a bi-monthly journal and continued to be its editor for over four decades (1964 - 2007). Dr. Miglani is also responsible for starting the Post-Graduate course in Hospital Pharmacy at Delhi College of Pharmacy, the only Post-Graduate course of its kind in India even today, which is leading the way for strengthening the branch of Pharmacy Practice across the country. Professor Miglani is thus the Founder and Father of not only the Indian Pharmacists’ Association but also of Hospital Pharmacy education in India. The introduction of subjects like Hospital Pharmacy, Clinical Pharmacy and Community Pharmacy in B.Pharm curriculum in 1980s; starting M.Pharm Pharmacy Practice course in a number of institutions during the latter part of 1990s and subsequent years and the introduction of Pharm. D in 2008 are considered milestones in the development and popularisation of Pharmacy Practice in India. Dr. Miglani’s standing as a leading pharmacy professional was recognised by his election as the General President of Indian Pharmaceutical Congress (1987). He has been recipient of various awards and prizes in India.
The Indian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy (IJHP) which Dr. Miglani founded in 1964 was single-handedly edited by him for over four decades. He nourished its growth and put in immense efforts to make this journal one of the prominent pharmacy publications in India. In Miglani’s hands, the editorial page of IJHP became a powerful tool for championing the cause of Hospital Pharmacy, Clinical Pharmacy, Community Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice in general. In the editorials of IJHP and in many lectures in conferences across India, he constantly strove for the improvement of service conditions-revision, sanction and implementation of better emoluments for hospital pharmacists; and other issues. The main aim of the journal is to disseminate pharmaceutical and scientific knowledge among hospital pharmacists all over the country. The better status of hospital pharmacists in India and the respect they enjoy today is through hard work and dedication of Dr. B. D. Miglani and through his writings in IJHP.
It is a matter of both pride and pleasure to note that a book Editing Pharmacy written by Dr. Miglani has been published. During his tenure as editor of IJHP, he wrote two hundred lead articles (Editorials) on various subjects and issues, the compilation of which constitutes this volume. A few editorials are also written by other professionals. Dr. Miglani has given his views as well as the views of the Association to create awareness about professional issues pertaining to Hospital, Clinical and Community Pharmacy in addition to suggesting plausible solutions to the problematic issues. The editorials which form this book also talk of the constitution of various committees formed at central and state levels: Study Group of Hospitals; Expert Committee on Hospital Pharmacy for Mysore State; Hospital Review Committee; Pay Commission Reports; Hathi Committee Report; Kelkar Committee Report; Lentin Commission Report; Mashelkar Committee Report; Vadiyanathan Committee Report on Medical Store Organizations, etc. A lot of memoranda were sent by readers of IJHP, and Indian Hospital Pharmacist’s Association also submitted memoranda to these committees. The recommendations made by these committees were published and commented upon in subsequent editorials of IJHP, which are published in this book. The establishment of the National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), autonomous Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission, setting up the fair shops in hospitals were also taken up through editorials of IJHP. The issues pertaining to the amendment to the Pharmacy Act, Drugs & Cosmetics Act and implementation of Section 42 of the Pharmacy Act were also highlighted in the editorials of IJHP, which are now all published in this book. Strong cases were made to Pay Commissions set up from time to time, through editorials of IJHP for better pay-scales for hospital pharmacists. The editorials of IJHP also drew attention to topics pertaining to academic, scientific and technical subjects, all worth reading in this book. The editorials of IJHP also persistently pleaded for upgrading the Diploma in Pharmacy to Degree in Pharmacy as minimum registration qualification under the Pharmacy Act. The lives and works of a few pharmaceuticals luminaries like M. L. Schroff, G. P. Srivastava, M. K. Rangnekar, K. N. Gaind, K. K. Acharjee, G. B. Ramasarma, and B. V. Patel, written in some editorial pages of IJHP are also covered in this book. Besides portrait photographs of some historical political personalities like Jawahar Lal Nehru, Mahatma Gandhi, Zakir Hussain, Indira Gandhi, Rajiv Gandhi covered in some editorials of IJHP make this book interesting.
Through his editorial writings in IJHP, Dr. Miglani has made his valuable contribution as a promoter and in some cases maker of policies for the uplift of Hospital Pharmacy in particular and profession of pharmacy in general. It is a matter of satisfaction that the views expressed in the editorials of IJHP, which are published in the book, contributed to success in achieving the objectives: implementation of Section 42 of Pharmacy Act; avoiding revalidation of Rule 65(15) (c) of Drugs & Cosmetics Act; setting up of NIPER; establishment of Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission; implementation of ER 1991 and procuring reasonable pay-scales for pharmacists through Pay Commissions. The decisions on the other issues have yet to come.
Written and presented in an excellent manner, this book is very much recommended to all the pharmaceutical and drug professionals in the universities and industries, besides all pharmaceutical and medical authorities dealing with health problems of the Indian masses. It is equally important that the younger generations of pharmacy students should read this book so as to understand as how pharmacy professionals struggled for over four decades to uplift the grade of Hospital Pharmacy in India and brought it to today’s respectful standard. Professor B. D. Miglani has done a great service to the profession of pharmacy and pharmacy practice, in particular to the profession of Hospital Pharmacy by publishing the editorials of IJHP in the form of a book. This book is convenient and a wonderful source of information with regard to growth of Hospital Pharmacy in India during the later decades of the twentieth century and beginning of the twenty-first century. In years to come, it shall be treated as an historical document and a must – have for all pharmacy professionals in this country.
Book Reviewed By: Dr. Ravindernath Kaul, Germany

 

 

 

Title

: Law Relating to Drugs and Cosmetics

Format

: Hardcover

Publishers

: Eastern Book Company

 

“Law Relating To Drugs and Cosmetics” by Vijay Mailk is an excellent, most dependable, comprehensive and up-to-date manual on Drugs & Cosmetics Act and the Rules there under. This new edition provides amended and updated text of the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 (as amended by Amendment Act 26 of 2008 which was enforced on August 10, 2009) and the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules, 1945 (as amended upto the Second Amendment Rules, 2011, along with case law notes, allied Acts, Rules, Orders and Notifications). The Drugs Price Control Order, 1995 has been amended upto the Second Amendment Order of 2006.
Under each section of the book, concise and coherent notes illustrative of the topic are given. As Allopathic, Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha systems have been brought under the purview of the Drugs & Cosmetics Act, this will book is a must for all personnel involved in the drug and cosmetics industry, manufacturers, distributors, libraries, academic institutions, blood banks, hospitals and practitioners, pharmacy / medicine students, central and state governments, bar associations, government departments, committees and others concerned with the subject.
Concise and coherent notes have been provided under important sections. The appendices provide several allied and useful statutes. A very detailed subject index and product index facilitate quick and easy search. The publisher should be commended for providing free updates to this edition on line. The updates will be available at www.ebcwebstore.com/drugsandcosmetics.

Book Reviewed By: Raman Sehgal

 

 

 

Title

: Instrumental Method in Pharmaceutical Analysis

Author

: P. C. Kamboj

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan

 

“Instrumental method in Pharmaceutical Analysis” is a very useful book for PG and UG students of pharmacy. The book specially deals with the basic theories of various spectroscopic and electro-analytical techniques. Spectroscopic method of analysis has been discussed very elaborately starting from the basics of electromagnetic radiations. Techniques like NMR, ESR, IR all have been nicely covered in this book. The discussions on electro-analytical techniques are quite informative. The author has stressed on the basic theories before going into detailed discussions, which is definitely making the book special. The correlation between chapters on electro-analytical techniques is excellent.
Few improvements are suggested for future edition. Some discussions on ICP MS or various ICP techniques would have made the book more complete in the area of atomic spectroscopy. More examples may be included for NMR, ESR and Mass spectrometry part for better understanding.
On the whole, the book offers excellent help to students for developing a strong base on pharmaceutical analytical techniques. The blend of basic principles and application of various spectroscopic and electro-analytical techniques has made the book very unique. The author has presented his view in a very brief, compact and comprehensive manner in a very lucid language..

Book Reviewed By: Arindam Basu 

 

 

 

Title

: Pioneers of Pharmaceutical Industry

Author

: Professor Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, Delhi

 

Pioneers of Pharmaceutical Industry
 
Professor Harkishan Singh continues his painstaking research to explore the subject “History of Pharmacy in India and Related Aspects.” He has already published a number of books on this topic: Pharmacopoeias and Formularies; Pharmaceutical Education; Pharmacy Practice; Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy (4 Volumes); and Pharmaceutical History of India. His latest book Pioneers of Pharmaceutical Industry is now released to the pharmacy world.

 
Professor Singh starts with the introduction about the development of Indian pharmaceutical industry during the 19th and 20th century. Then he writes the biographies of the pioneers who laid the foundation of the drug industry of the country. India’s pharmaceutical industry has a long and a diverse history. In 1797 the production of opium became a monopoly of the Government of India and in 1820 opium factories were set up in different parts of the country. Cinchona production started in 1860. Another development of note was the setting of Government Medical Stores Depots during 1870 at Madras, Bombay, Calcutta and Lahore. The pharmaceutical companies started growing in the country in a humble way. The industry received some fillip during the First World War in 1914 as the imports were almost completely cut off. The manufacture of galenicals and production of caffeine from tea dust and surgical dressings were established. After the war, the manufacture of biological products like sera and vaccines, anaesthetics like ether and chloroform, and coal tar distillation products such as naphthalene, cresol etc. was undertaken by the industry. More of the drug manufacturing firms started coming up since 1919 and the creation of manufacturing houses continued during 1930s in spite of strong competition as import of foreign products were resumed again. The outbreak of Second World War in 1939 gave an impetus to drug industry and a number of companies made beginnings during the war days and there was severe competition from foreign producers after the war was over. A significant development was the setting of different committees by Government of India to study the state of affairs and progress and improvement of the drug industry of the country, to name a few of them; Drugs Enquiry Committee, 1930-31 (Chopra Committee); Panel on Fine Chemicals, Drugs and Pharmaceuticals, 1945 (Chopra Panel); Health Survey and Development Committee, 1946 (Bhore Committee); Pharmaceutical Enquiry Committee, 1953 (Bhatia Committee); Health Survey and Planning Committee, 1959-61 (Mudaliar Committee); Patents Enquiry Committee, 1948-50 (Tek Chand Committee); Patents Law, 1959 (Ayyangar Report); Committee on Drugs and Pharmaceuticals, 1974 (Hathi Committee). All these committees made cogent recommendations with respect to scope and development of pharmaceutical industry of the country. The pharmaceutical industry started growing rapidly and the country achieved self-sufficiency in formulations and also in large number of bulk drugs. From the colonial period we inherited drug industry with annual production capacity of Rupees 10 crore only. During the last six decades the pharmaceutical industry has made tremendous progress. It is now counted among the top producers of drugs and pharmaceuticals of the world and has touched Rs 100,000 crore turnovers annually. Many pharmaceutical luminaries have contributed to the development of pharmaceutical industry in the country of which a few mentioned here have played a prominent role.

 
Prafulla Chandra Ray (1861-1944) was instrumental in the start of the Bengal Chemical and Pharmaceutical Works (BCPW), Calcutta and the credit for ushering in the era of manufacture of drugs in India goes to him. The small scale production began in a humble way at his residence at Calcutta in 1892 with a capital of Rs 800 only. The enterprise became a limited liability company in 1901. As time passed the BCPW emerged to be a chemo-pharmaceutical industrial giant. The principal lines of manufacture of the company were chemicals, pharmaceuticals, biological products, surgical dressings, tar products, toilet preparations and scientific instruments.

 
Tribhovandas Kalyandas Gajjar (1863-1920) brought out the awakening on the western coast about chemical technology and catalysed the spread of chemical based industry; this had direct bearing on pharmaceutical manufacture. Professor Gajjar and his students A. S. Kotibhaskar and B.D.Amin started Alembic Chemical Works at Baroda in 1907. The firm which began with small scale manufacture of tinctures and other galenicals, developed with passage of time, into a major drug manufacturing house with diverse activities. Gajjar also established Kala Bhavan at Baroda and Techno-Chemical Laboratory at Bombay.

 
Harry Cooper (1888-1935) an experienced British pharmaceutical chemist had a significant role in the development of pharmacy in colonial India. He came to India in 1919 to serve the Calcutta firm Smith, Stanistreet & Co. Ltd., which started as apothecary shop in 1821. It became a prominent European pharmacy, manufacturing and wholesale chemists during the colonial period. Harry Cooper took charge of the company in 1919 as the Chief Chemist, later becoming the Works Manager and Director. Under Cooper’s care the company became a prominent drug industry at Calcutta. Cooper was also a member of Drugs Enquiry Committee (1930-31) headed by Sir Ram Nath Chopra.
 

Khwaja Abdul Hamied ( 1898- 1972) founded the Chemical, Industrial and Pharmaceutical Laboratories (CIPLA) in 1935 at Bombay. By 1972, the Cipla had two manufacturing units, one for Pharmaceuticals and the other for Fine Chemicals, Drug Intermediates, Steroids and Hormones. Cipla Agricultural Division was started at Bangalore for cultivation of medicinal plants. The company continued to progress and is today a leading drug industry in India.

 
Apostolos Raptakos (1889-1964) hailed from Greece and made India his home professionally. He in association with an Englishman W.H. Brett founded the company The Raptakos, Brett & Co. Ltd., in 1930 in Calcutta and then shifted to Bombay in 1934. Raptakos became its first Managing Director. New factories were built at Madras in 1959 and Thane in 1963. They manufacture and process drugs, pharmaceuticals and dietetic specialities mostly from indigenous raw materials. Liver Extract (oral) and Aluminium Hydroxide Gel are main drug intermediates manufactured for captive consumption. It is one of the leading pharmaceutical companies of the country.

 
Homi Ruttonji Nanji (1909-1967) played a leading role in drug control, drug analysis and also became a prominent figure in the promotion of drug industry in the country. After his early role in pharmaceutical education, statutory control of drugs, pharmacy practice, and member of various professional/statutory pharmacy organisations, Nanji moved to accept assignment in drug industry of the country and worked in various positions. He had an active liaison with Indian Chemical Manufacturing Association (ICMA), which made a beginning in 1938, and he was founder of Organisation of Pharmaceutical Producers of India (OPPI). He played a great role in the development of drug industry and so created awareness of this sector in India. He continued membership of the statutory body the Development Council of Drugs and Pharmaceuticals right from its inception in 1955 and his becoming its Chairman for two terms (1961-1965) confirmed the level of his stature in the pharmaceutical industrial circles of India.

 
Amrut Vithaldas Mody (1914-1999) was among the eminent pharmaceutical professionals of the twentieth century and contributed in the development of drug industry in India. The Indian Pharmaceutical Association (IPA) was largely the medium of his professional activities as he held positions in the organisation and contributed to its development in various ways. Mody was founder of Unichem Laboratories Ltd., Bombay in 1944 and also became its Chairman and Managing Director. It became a successful and progressive drug firm in the country with various products like vitamin and hormone preparations, haematinics, analgesics, and curative medicines for tuberculosis, dysentery, diabetics and also antispasmodic drugs and life saving drugs like noradrenaline and mannitol. Mody also became Chairman and Director of Uni-Sanyko Ltd., Hyderbad; Uni-UCB Ltd., Bombay’s Uni-Drupha Pvt. Ltd., Aroor Chemcials Pvt. Ltd., Cochin; Cochin Pam Pvt. Ltd., Cochin; and Viramrut Investment Pvt. Ltd., Bombay. He was the Director of Nagpal Petrochem Ltd., Madras and Pylos Packaging Pvt. Ltd., Bombay. Amrut Vithaldas Mody was a great luminary of pharmaceutical profession who gained prominent position in the drug industry.

 
Professor Singh has given an excellent description of the history of the development of pharmaceutical and drug industry of India during the last two centuries. Many pioneers contributed to the development of drug industry. Their works and achievements are worth reading in this book. The names of many more professionals who were directly or indirectly associated with the development of drug industry also find a place in this book. Besides this, the names of companies which made their beginnings during the War days are also mentioned. The speeches and addresses of these pioneers of drug industry delivered at various conferences held on different occasions are listed in Appendix I-IV.
I feel this book is an eye opener to the present and future pharmaceutical generations as how India’s pharmaceutical industries through humble start, stiff competition, hard work and dedication of these brilliant pioneers have come to occupy one of the leading positions in the world. Therefore, great credit goes to Professor Harkishan Singh for the precise collection of the background history which ultimately reveals the building up and establishment of the drug industry of India. Last but not least, his brilliant, informative and interesting way of narrating, keeps the readers spellbound up to the last page.

Book Reviewed By: Dr Ravindernath Kaul, Germany 

 

 

 

Title

: Sethi’s Quantitative Analysis of Pharmaceutical Formulations

Author

: Dr. P.D. Sethi

Publishers

: CBS Publishers, New Delhi

 

Dr. P. D. Sethi, a natural product chemist turned pharmaceutical analytical chemist has rendered a yeoman’s service to pharmacy profession and professionals since 1985 when he brought out his first book “Quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations” - First edition followed by immensely useful books on spectrophotometric analysis, TLC, HPTLC and HPLC. All the books authored by Dr. Sethi gained tremendous popularity among pharmaceutical analysts working either in industry or in academics. No analytical laboratory was complete without the series on pharmaceutical analysis books written by him.
The present book is the Fourth Edition of “Quantitative Analysis of Pharmaceutical Formulations” in four volumes. The book is an improved version of earlier editions as it includes reaction mechanism and the chemistry involved in the analytical procedures. The contents of the book have been arranged in thirteen main chapters each containing different multi-component formulations. Methods(s) of analysis for each ingredient in the formulation have been given along with the probable reaction mechanism. The whole matter is contained in 4 volumes. Volume 1 of the book contains introductory account and very useful and informative chapters on good laboratory practices; calibration of analytical instruments; method development; SOP on reference and working standards. All details of these elementary processes have been minutely discussed. Besides, this volume contains methods of analysis of multi-ingredient formulations of Cardiovascular Drugs (17 formulations) and Anti-inflammatory Drugs (12 formulations).
Volume 2 embodies three chapters, the first one contains methods of analysis for multi- ingredient formulations of Analgesics and Antipyretics (39 formulations); Antibiotics (26 formulations); Sedatives and Tranquillizers (13 formulation). Likewise, contents of volume 3 are Expectorants, Cough suppressants and Anti-allergies (41 formulations); Bronchospasm Relaxants (Anti-asthma) (26 formulations); Alimentary Drugs (sic Gastrointestinal Drugs) (56 formulations). Volume 4 of the books has chapters on Eye, Ear & Nose Preparations (17 preparations); Topical Antifungal and Anti-infective Preparations (22 preparations); Rubefacients (8 formulations), Keratolytics and Cleansers (10 formulations): and Miscellaneous Vitamins, Minerals and Digestive Enzyme Preparations (34 preparations).
To compile an account on methods of analysis, procedure, probable reaction mechanism and references of each of the ingredients of 321 formulations is an up-hill task. The author has single handedly done this heroic task, which is indeed commendable. The graphic representation of chemical structures is excellent and so is the printing of the whole text for which the publisher has to be given credit. The contents of the books have been adequately indexed.
Dr. Sethi, deserves our congratulations for bringing out the highly valuable volumes beneficial for pharmaceutical industry and pharmaceutical educational institutions.
The book is highly recommended and is a must for libraries, institutions and industry.

Book Reviewed By: Prof. V. K. Kapoor 

 

 

 

Title

: The Dream for Life

Author

:

Publishers

:

 

This book chronicles a heartrending collection of real life stories of cancer patients & their care givers. Dr PP Bapsy, through this book has tried to capture the emotions of cancer patients and how they face the crises related to this much feared disease. The stories are all true incidents (the names have been changed) from the lives of patients whom she came across in her career spanning over three decades.
Dr. Bapsy, a well known oncologist, through the narration of true life stories brings forth this existing lack of awareness and at the same time dispels these misconceptions about cancer beyond doubt. The messages conveyed are that many cancers are curable if detected early, are preventable by avoiding hazardous habits like tobacco, practice of genital hygiene, the need for annual health check up, not to delay a consultation because of fear of cancer. The stories have been narrated in simple everyday language & reach out to patients suffering from cancer, filling them with hope & equipping them with courage to emerge victorious in this battle. This book will serve as a guide to all its readers & will be of significant value in Apollo Hospital’s cancer control efforts.

Book Reviewed By: T. N. Bazaz 

 

 

 

Title

: Sethi’s HPTLC Content Uniformity of Pharmaceutical Formulations

Author

: Dr. P.D.Sethi

Publishers

: KONGPOSH Publication Pvt. Ltd.

 

The book entitled “Sethi’s HPTLC content uniformity of pharmaceutical Formulations” is an author’s successful attempt to use HPTLC technique for content uniformity test as an alternate method over HPLC, being the method of choice in all leading pharmacopoeias i.e. IP, BP, USP, EP etc.
In this book Author has given detailed method of analysis for content uniformity test by HPTLC. There are 45 Protocol for different 45 pharmaceutical formulations. The book consists mainly two parts. Part-A from page number 1-60 , having 30 formulations containing one active substance and Part-B from page number 62-121, having 15 formulations containing two active substances. Each protocol has been described with Formulation, Drug classification, Dosage form, sample/standard preparation, chromatographic equipments, sample application scheme, chromatographic condition, densitometric evaluation and densitogram. RSD for both standard and sample has been calculated. At the end of the book a comparative Analytical data for content uniformity Test by HPTLC and HPLC has been given for (i) Mean assay (%) values of 10 individual dosage (ii) Assay range (iii) RSD (%). Quite comparable results support the Author’s claim for use of HPTLC for content uniformity test as an alternate technique.
As we know, in the content uniformity test by HPTLC all the ten dosage forms of a sample and five replicates of standards can be analyzed simultaneously while in HPLC, we have to run one by one. In this way both time and money could be saved. In my personal opinion HPTLC is a versatile, simple, fast and cost effective technique.
Dr. P.D. Sethi is well known Authority in the field of pharmaceutical analysis. He is PhD from Madras University in pharmacognosy and Former Director of Central Drug testing laboratory Mumbai. He has written a number of books in pharmaceutical Analysis using different analytical techniques like UV-vis spectrophotometry, TLC, HPTLC and HPLC.
I would like to congratulate, Dr. P.D. Sethi for such an excellent attempt to compile this unique book. The book would be helpful for Analyst working in quality control of a Pharmaceutical Industry, Drug testing Laboratory and R&D centers.

Book Reviewed By: Dr. R.A. Singh, Director, Regional Drugs Testing Laboratory, Chandigarh. 

 

 

 

Title

: Polyvinylpyrrolidone Excipient For Pharmaceuticals

Author

: Volker BÜhler

Publishers

: Springer (India) Private Limited

 

This book is a comprehensive coverage on polyvinylpyrrolidone (Povidone) as a pharmaceutical excipients.
Pharmaceutical excipients is an important component of pharmaceutical preparations, its role is to ensure that drugs must selectively transported to the target position the body with certain speed and time of release. Therefore, for better efficacy of the medicines, the selection of appropriate excipients is very important during manufacturing of the medicines.
For this purpose overall knowledge regarding physico-chemical properties, pharmaceutical application and toxicological information of different kinds of excipients is very essential. As this book is a outcome of exclusive informative collection about the physico-chemical properties, qualitative and quantitative analytical methods, pharmaceutical applications and toxicological information of soluble polyvinyl pyrrolidone (povidone), insoluble polyvinyl pyrrolidone crospovidone) and vinylpyrrolidone-vinylacetate copolymer copovidone), it is very useful to those who are looking for the book deals with the most valuable pharmaceutical excipients like povidone.
The whole book is divided into six well chapters and the author has very meticulously shared his knowledge, experience and expertise in these chapters. In this well written book the author has documented all important information like general synthesis, molecular structure, synonyms, product properties, analytical methods, pharmaceutical applications, and toxicological data of polyvinylpyrrolidone and its copolymer.
Finally, this book which is a collection of very useful information and outcome of enriched knowledge and vast experience of the author is not only beneficial to all the persons involved in the field of pharmacy and health science for their academic and research purposes but also equally important to the other scientific persons interested in the pharmacy.
It is believed that because of the enriched text and good systematic presentation with impressive language, this book will definitely finds its place among all the book lovers and researchers who are looking for a quality book dealing with the excipients.

Book Reviewed By: Dr. Dilip Kumar Panda, Central Drugs Laboratory, Kolkata 

 

 

 

Title

: St. John's Wort or Hypericum

Author

: Dr. Ravindernath Kaul, Germany   durgaravi.kaul@gmail.com

Publishers

 

 

St. John's Wort or Hypericum

St. John's Wort or Hypericum has become an important source for phytotherapeutic preparation especially in North America and Europe. It is particularly well known for its uses in the treatment of mild forms of depression and is a classic example of an indigenous European medicinal plant transformed into a 'modern' herbal remedy. Sales of preparations containing St. John's Wort have soared in recent years. The book covers all relevant aspects of this drug. Detailed discussions on the plant's botanical and pharmacognostical characteristics, the natural product know from the species, quality control aspects (including the standardisation of extracts), pharmacological (pharmacodynamic and some pharmacokinetic) studies in animals and humans and clinical studies included is impressive. Some of these use a very rigorous methodology, thus giving good evidence for the species' clinical efficacy.
The continuing debate whether hypericin (a naphtodinathrone) or hyoperforin (a complex terpenoid) is more relevant for the clinically observed effects is not discussed specifically, but since the author provides numerous pharmacological data on the various types of extracts and on the pure compounds, the reader may well draw his/her own conclusions.
The book provides a very good overview on all pharmaceutical aspects of this important medicinal plant. Obviously in a rapidly developing field new important data come in constantly. The recent finding of the risk of interactions between hypericum extracts, and, for example, anti-coagulants has not yet been included.
It is therefore to be hoped that the book will be updated regularly. Because of the strong interest in this 'herbal product' in English-speaking countries, an edition in English would be very useful.
This book is part of a series on medicinal plants, which have yielded important phytotherapeutic preparations (e.g. Crataegus spp., Ginkgo biloba). Hopefully this series will be expanded in order to summarize basic scientific information about widely used medicinal plants. From an ethnopharmacological perspective, the book is of particular interest since it shows the multitude of studies required to transform a 'traditional' medicine into clinically used phytotherapeutic preparations. But it also clearly demonstrates that it is worth the effort.
This very good book is of relevance to anyone interested in European phytotherapy, or in medicinal plant research in general and, of course, it is a 'must' for all working on St. John's Wort. 

 

 

 

Title

: Reflections, on life changes

Author

: VASUNDHARA RAMANUJAN, MOHAMMAD AKMAL, MD

Publishers

 

 

Time had stood still. Stunned into a silence, we felt our lives suspended by a thin, fragile rope with uncertainty looming large. Our fifteen and a half year old son’s kidneys were nearly shut down. “Chronic kidney failure,” was the words used by the specialist. The suddenness had made us apprehensive and we smelt danger, discomforted by the newness of this disease that was supposedly associated with adults. To regain our lost composure we needed to find some good solutions.
Using analytical skills, armed with some courage and understanding, we took baby steps in gaining knowledge. It meant closely studying every aspect of the disease. As we unraveled the mystery of kidney failure, we learnt the gravity of the disease which kept the patient involved with diet, medication, blood pressure monitoring, and periodic check- ups. Each of these was directly related to food and fluid intake as a measure against urine outputs.
The family worked together, on a set goal of a transplant option as soon as my son began dialysis. I offered my kidney. It was a practical decision. My husband was a diabetic and my elder son just seventeen years. A few years later, after I finally managed to donate my kidney against all odds of fighting a breast cancer, the horrific chemotherapy and radiation, I experienced many other feelings. It was not joy, nor was it pride, but a completely new sense of being me, myself.
Life had changed dramatically but I drew comfort of having reached the safe zone.
I saw the whole world on the other side. They did not see, know, or understand how and why our lives had changed. I made it my responsibility of telling how a young man faced the life threatening disease, sought treatments and finally found joy in his life. Importantly tell people why they should protect themselves against a kidney failure by taking preventive steps in certain health conditions.
I realized that managing life with the disease was difficult, sometimes the huge treatment cost made it unaffordable for some patients. Finding a willing donor was a huge task, and many were unsuccessful in even arranging a transplant. Above all a cancer survivor qualifying for a kidney donation was uncommon.
“Shades of Life” is an inspiring book that could touch people in every walk of life. The protagonist made it his mission to find joy and lead a wonderful, near normal life. He lost his kidney again in 2006. After many earth-shattering experiences, his elder brother donated a kidney in 2009. In these 15 years, my son had graduated from Mumbai’s Xavier’s College, did Masters in IIT, Powai, graduated as a Doctorate in Physics from University of Southern California and is now on a post doctorate at University of Alberta, Canada. 

 

 

 

Title

: PHARMACOKINETICS AND THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING

Author

: Dr. Nitin Mahurkar and O.S. Kamalapurkar

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, New Delhi

 

Drug research encompasses several diverse disciplines united by a common goal, namely the development of novel therapeutic agents. Pharmacokinetics and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring has assumed a great value in drug discovery. Many new combinations of drugs are being invented and made available frequently. The knowledge of pharmacokinetics is a thrust area for optimizing safe and efficacious drug therapy. Also, pharmacokinetics has now become a formal course of study especially with introduction of Pharm. D course by the Pharmacy Council of India.
In the initial few chapters of the book, the fundamentals of rate kinetics, factors defining the Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of a drug are discussed with suitable examples. The chapters on compartment models of `Pharmacokinetics’ are discussed as one, two and three compartment models based on route of administration of the drugs. The model independent kinetics has also been explained in detail. The chapter on dosage regimen discusses the concept of various parameters that are important in determining the quantum of dose and its use. The concept of `Therapeutic Drug Monitoring’ (TDM) of some selected drugs is also discussed.
To keep pace with the advances, the authors have made a sincere effort towards elaborating the comprehensive fundamental principles of `Pharmacokinetics’ in a simple and easily understandable approach. Overall the book presents the subject in a simple and lucid manner and would be a good reference resource for all pharmacy students.
 
Book Reviewed by Mr. Raman Sehgal

 

 

 

Title

: Pharmaceutical History of India

Author

: Professor Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, Delhi - 110 033

 

India would have lost the history of pharmaceutical developments, thanks to the painstaking efforts of Professor Harkishan Singh that has given us a wealth of literature on this subject. Since last 20 years, he has been working to explore the history of modern pharmacy in India covering the span of last few centuries including the pharmaceutical progress in independent India. He has collected a great deal of historical material through his travels to different libraries in India and abroad and by large and scholarly correspondence. He has compiled his research work in 22 chapters in his latest book “Pharmaceutical History of India”.

 
Chapter 1 begins with the Introduction of the arrival of European powers on the Indian subcontinent with the coming of Portuguese Vasco da Gama in 1498. Subsequently Dutch and French came followed by British, who took control of the vast land and East India Company was established. Portuguese teacher and physician Garcia da Orta who stayed in Goa for three decades (1534-1564) studied Indian material medica and wrote extensively on this subject.

 
Chapter 2 deals with Colonial Professions of Medicine and Pharmacy. The Indian Medical Service (I.M.S.) was founded in British India which led to the establishment of medical education first in Calcutta and then in Madras. Apothecaries and hospitals assistants classes were also started. Pharmacy profession stood neglected during the British rule and overall situation with regard to drugs and practice of pharmacy remained a grave concern.

 
Chapter 3 provides historical aspects of British Period Pharmacies. One can know about M/s K.R. Chandran, S.F. Ranji, B.K. Paul, I.G. Gajjar, Jalbhai Billimoria, Lalchand Dodha, K. Venkatapathi Naidu, R.B. Sen, Ratan Lal Gupta and Dr Shaib Singh on one side and great pharmacies of yesteryears like Smith, Stanistreet & Co (Calcutta), S.Brothers (Bombay), Bill & Co (Bombay), Appah & Co (Madras), Imperial Medical Hall / H.C. Sen & Co (Delhi) and Beli Ram & Brothers (Bombay), to mention a few of them.

 
Chapter 4 deals with Colonial Overseas Drug Trade with special reference to foreign trade in general, export of raw drugs and import of drugs and medicines.

 
Chapter 5 describes Qualified Indian Chemists and Druggists, which laid the process for the profession of pharmacy. The chemists and druggists’ class started in Madras in 1860. The contributions of S.Rajagopal Naidu are recorded. For the uniform system of education for qualification as pharmacists, Pharmaceutical Society of India, the oldest organisation of its type was founded in 1925 with such prominent architects and builders like Wilfred Pereira and A.N. Lazarus.

 
Chapter 6 Compounders’ Community illustrates greatly and traces the history in Bengal, Madras, Bombay and other provinces in times as early as 1881. All India Compounders’ and Dispensers’ Association was founded in 1923 and All Bengal Compounders’ Association in 1929. The contributions of Raj Bahadur and K.K. Acharjee are mentioned.

 
Chapter 7 Pharmacopoeias in Colonial Times gives a historical account of the London Pharmacopoeia with three Hindustani translations of 1824, 1843 and 1845. There follows a description of Bengal Dispensatory (1841) and Bengal Pharmacopoeia (1844), both works of W.B.O’Shaughnessy. Next the forgotten–even in India–Pharmacopoeia of India (1868) prepared by Edward John Waring which gave special attention to indigenous Indian remedies and its Supplement (1869) are described. In 1900, the process of making Indian and Colonial Addendum to British Pharmacopoeia of 1898 also started. The Addendum was incorporated into British Pharmacopoeia of 1914 that became recognised as first complete “Imperial Pharmacopoeia”. A latent movement for the national Indian pharmacopoeia succeeded in providing the Indian Pharmacopoeial List 1946. An Indian Pharmaceutical Codex appeared in 1953. A complete description of the British Pharmacopoeias (1864-1945) is also given

 
Chapter 8 gives information and background of Drugs Enquiry Committee (1930-31) appointed by Government of India to study the trade of drugs in Indian market. Lt. Col. R.N. Chopra was appointed Chairman of the Committee. Its history-making report in 1931 made cogent recommendations which paved the way for drugs and pharmacy legislations, pharmacopoeial publications and development of pharmacy profession in the country.

 

Chapter 9 is a short review of the Health Survey and Development Committee appointed by the Government of India in 1943 to make a broad survey of the existing position in regard to health conditions and to make recommendations for future developments.

 
Chapter 10 is a narration of the historical perspective of Drugs and Pharmacy Statutes pertaining primarily to development in India. For the sake of comparison attention is also drawn to the scene in Britain of the time when India was their colony. Described here is British Pharmacy Legislations (1852-1933); Drugs Statutes in Britain (1875-1928); Indian Drug Legislation; Anderson Report (1937); Import of Drugs Bill (1937); Drugs Act (1940). After independence Pharmacy Act (1948); Drugs and Magic Remedies (Objectionable Advertisements) Act (1954); Drugs and Cosmetics Act (1947) and Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act (1985) were introduced.

 
Chapter 11 explains Pharmacopoeias and Formularies and the influence of British Pharmacopoeia of 1948 and 1953 in the preparation of first Pharmacopoeia of India (The Indian Pharmacopoeia) 1955. Their follows descriptions of Indian Pharmacopoeias of 1966, 1985, 1996, 2007 and the National Formulary of India that appeared in 1968 and was revised in 1966 and 1979. The composition of various Indian Pharmacopoeial Committees and functions of India Pharmacopoeia Commission is given.

 
Chapter 12 PC1 and Education for Pharmacy Practice gives a detailed account of the role of Pharmacy Council of India (PCI), constituted under Pharmacy Council Act 1948, in making regulations called Education Regulations prescribing the minimum standard of education required for qualification as pharmacist.

 
Chapter 13 titled Baccalaureate Educations portrays a composite picture of the historical and contemporary pharmaceutical instruction, expanding upon the historical perspective of issues pertaining to pharmaceutical education. Profiles of older and new pharmaceutical institutions and numerous portrait photographs are chronicled. Surveys of changing patterns in the course of study and curricula are also presented.

 
Chapter 14 narrates the development of Postgraduate Studies and Research in India. History of various institutions imparting Masters and Doctoral degrees in pharmacy is given. Reports of various Committees (Thacker, Nayudamma) for admission to postgraduate studies and its course of study are also mentioned. Doctoral studies, research and recognitions in Indian institutions are as well covered. A brief description of National Intuitions of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER) in Mohali (Punjab) is also given.

 
Chapter 15 deals with AICTE and Pharmaceutical Education. After independence pharmaceutical education in general got drawn into the ambit of All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE). A survey of pertinent developments in this context is the subject of this chapter.

 
Chapter 16 Pharmacy Faculties covers the history of creation of pharmacy faculties in the country.

 
Chapter 17 illustrates the code of Pharmacy Ethics. With the advent of Pharmacy Act 1948, slowly the pharmacy practice started taking shape as a profession. The prerequisites for one’s entry into the profession and necessary registration for the purpose were defined. The pharmacy ethics are covered in its entirety of how the thought came up, got developed, adopted including the recent happenings.

 
Chapter 18 gives the development of Hospital Pharmacy in India, its forerunners, and tribulations, the struggles etc. The development of properly organised hospital pharmacy and its management, the role played by pharmacists who worked in hospitals like M/s S.H. Merchant, Dr B.D. Miglani, V.K. Osterling, J.S. Walia, K.K. Kaistha and Miss N.S. Gayatonde is notably recorded. The recent developments in concept of Clinical Pharmacy Practice; Drug Information Centre and Didactics are also appropriately covered.

 
Chapter 19 gives the description of Retail and Community Pharmacy. The pharmacy profession started getting systematised only in the post-colonial era. The contributions of S.N. Biswas and A. Raptakos are mentioned. Also covered are Trade Related Issues; Dispensing, Retailing and Community Care; Over the Counter Drugs; Pharmacist as Health Educator; Role in Family Planning Programmes and Professional Emblem.

 
Chapter 20 Rural Pharmacy aptly records the dilemmas related to delivery of health care at rural levels adequately in a vast and a diverse country like India, and seemingly simplistic solutions recommended at different time periods.

 
Chapter 21 covers the history of Pharmaceutical Industry under the subtitles: Colonial Drug Industry and Related Developments; Towards Building of a Formidable Base on the Country becoming Independent and Domestic Self-sufficiency and Making to a Globally Competitive Status. The roles of some pioneers of pharmaceutical industry like Ray, Gajjar, Kotibhaskar, Amin, Cooper and Hamied are mentioned. List of 25 top pharmaceutical companies in India is also mentioned.

 
Chapter 22 covers the Biographies of pharmaceutical professionals of yore who contributed to pharmacy education, pharmaceutical profession and industrial developments in India both during the colonial period and after the independence of the country. Prof. M.L. Schroff (to whom 2011this book is dedicated) laid the foundation of pharmacy education at Banaras Hindu University (BHU) in 1932. N.K. Basu, D.N. Majumdar, G.P. Srivastava and S. Prasad were other prominent educationists of BHU. R.P. Patel and M.L. Khorna also contributed to pharmacy education and pharmacy profession in general. K.C. Chatterjee, H.R. Nanji and B.V. Patel played a great role in the development of industry, statutory control of drugs and pharmacy practice. S.N. Biswas, J.C. Ghosh and B.N. Vyas were other prominent pharmacy professional of the last century. Several medico pharmaceutical professionals like R.N. Chopra, K.S. Grewal and B. Mukerji have contributed a lot to the pharmaceutical developments in India.

 
Prof. Singh has done a great service to the profession of pharmacy by writing this book. The book is excellently written and it is a treasure for the pharmacy profession, not only in India but for the pharmacy world. Pharmacy profession in Western countries means practice in community and institutional pharmacies. A pharmaceutical history book covering various aspects of pharmacy disciplines has been written for the first time. The author has explored in various chapters the developments of pharmacy practice in India covering over 150 years of history and thus provided a valuable informative data on this subject. The author has further given a brilliant account of the British Indian pharmacopoeial history and thus made a new original addition to the subject of history of pharmacopoeias. The development of pharmacy education in a large country like India was a complex process and the author puts it together into a clear understandable essay. Biographies of persons who helped in the development of pharmacy profession in the country makes the book interesting to read. Numerous pictures of pharmacies, pharmacopoeias, institutions and portrait photographs sprinkled throughout the book help break up the text. An appendix of the supplementary readings at the end of the book gives a complete bibliographical list of the publications of the author. The cover picture of the book shows the front view of the University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panjab University, Chandigarh. This book should serve as a standard text book in the Indian Universities and a reference on the subject of history of Indian pharmacy. Prof. Singh has produced an excellent record of the pharmaceutical history of India and the subject pharmacy in general, which could be a valuable resource for understanding one of the most important professional fields in India today.

Book Reviewed By: Dr Ravindernath Kaul, Germany

 

 

 

Title

: Life – An Odyssey

Author

: Dr. Manish Maladkar

Publishers

: Pustak Mahal

 

Under the title of Life – An Odyssey: Time Tested Mantras Providing Solutions to Life’s Problems, the author has compiled selective 35 mussing which throws light on the hurdles in the journey of human life and the ways to brings about happiness from these hurdles in ourselves and spreading it to others. Incorporation of heart touching short stories and beautiful quotes makes this literature more interesting and worth reading.

 
This book encompasses the deep desire of completeness within the soul, which drives a man from the seen to the unseen, to philosophy and ultimately to the divine. This book is intended for those capable of knowing their own good. As a thinker, the author just wishes to awaken the reader to his own self. We receive from life not what we want, but what we need. So it is with wisdom that, it requires wisdom to understand wisdom. That inherent wisdom, ‘Life-An Odyssey’ intends to touch, an effort to affect eternity.

 
The author quotes Buddha’s view on life’s journey: Faith is nourishment, Virtuous deeds are a shelter, Wisdom is the light by day and Right mindfulness is the protection by night. If a man lives a pure life, nothing can destroy him. If he has conquered greed, nothing can limit his freedom. Life is a mystery for those who keep on running behind their expectations, ignoring the need of exploring their soul and happiness therein. The changing culture of an individual and the society towards unhealthy social environment makes it necessary to find the right path for the journey of life. The idea behind Life – An Odyssey is to explore the different aspects of life, which everybody experiences in their day-to-day living, though of importance, these are largely ignored due to our so called ‘busy schedules’.

 
Life-An Odyssey: Time-tested Mantras Providing Solutions to Life’s Problems arouses the dormant conscience buried deep within each person due to our hectic lifestyles. Hence, this book can be a pocket guide for students, and professionals who would love to bring stability into their lives in this fast-paced world.
Book Reviewed by: T. N. Bazaz

 

 

 

Title

: Textbook of Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics – Concepts and Applications

Author

: C.V.S. Subrahmanyam

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, Delhi - 110 033

 

The science and technology associated with pharmacy has progressed immensely over the last few decades. Significant advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. This has necessitated the need to optimize the drug therapy. The aim of the drug formulator is to develop dosage forms that ensures optimum amount of drug reaches the target site; at an optimal rate and its concentration is maintained throughout the entire duration of therapy. Therefore, it is essential that we understand the fate of drug after its administration; the rate processes to which it is subjected in the body and its behavior after biotransformation. The twin disciplines of Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics have, therefore, been developed with the objective of learning how drugs can be utilized optimally in the treatment of diseases–through design and development of new and better therapeutic moieties, new dosage forms and appropriate dosage regimens.
This book consists of 15 chapters. The chapter on Absorption of Drugs has been dealt with comprehensively as most of its principles also form the basis of drug distribution and elimination. Elaborate treatment of text on Biotransformation of Drugs in chapter 5 is justified since a pharmacy student is well versed with the basic chemistry and enzymology. A brief mention about Bioactivation and Tissue Toxicity has been included at the end of this chapter so that after understanding the mechanisms of drug metabolism, a student will be better placed to appreciate their significance. Prodrugs discussed in chapter 6 give insight into the manner in which chemical formulation techniques can be utilized to overcome some of the inherent biopharmaceutic and pharmacokinetic problems of the active principles. Mathematical treatment of chapters on pharmacokinetics has been kept to at modest level in order not to overburden the students with the complexities of equations and formulae.
A brief description of methods usually employed to enhance the bioavailability of a drug from its formulation has been included at the end of chapter 12. In addition to covering various aspects of design of dosage regimens and application of pharmacokinetic principles in clinical situations, the text contains a final chapter on Controlled Release Medication to familiarize the students with the principles involved in the design of innovative formulations.
Though several books are available on the subject, the material in most of them is presented in a diffused form or is highly specialized and discernible to those proficient in the field. The textbook presents the information in a lucid, condensed and cohesive form, to cater specifically the needs of undergraduate and graduate students of pharmacy.
Book Reviewed by: Raman Sehgal, Associate Editor, The Pharma Review, New Delhi, India (MSc; Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences).

 

 

 

Title

: Optimization in Drug Concepts – InVitro Methods

Author

: Zhengyin Yan and Gary Caldwell

Publishers

: Humana Press

 

Recent analysis of drug attrition rate shows that a significant number of potential drug candidates fail in the later stages of clinical development either due to faulty ADME or due to systemic toxicity / safety issues. Lead optimization in drug discovery thus plays an important role in attempting to uncover the defects in so called drug candidates. The book Optimization in Drug Concepts – InVitro Methods is compilation of detailed experimental protocols necessary for assaying compounds under evaluation. The book has 25 chapters and each chapter is contributed by subject matter expert and covers a wide spectrum of topics that include physiochemical properties, drug absorption, plasma protein binding, metabolism, drug toxicity and drug interactions. Chapter 1 provides experimental methods measuring fundamental physiochemical properties (pka solubility and lipophilicity). CACO-2 model is described in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 covers PAMPA (parallel artificial membrane permeability) in detail. The perfused rat intestinal model, which is considered as a gold standard for evaluation of drug absorption is outlined in Chapter 4.
Chapters 5 and 6 discusses about screening compounds targeting CNS disease and anti cancer molecules respectively. Chapter 7 outlines a different approach to investigate the involvement of drug transporters using oocytes injected with cRNAs. Chapters 8 and 9 present several different methods evaluating plasma protein binding, which include equilibrium dialysis, ultrafiltration and isothermal titration calorimetry. The metabolic stability of drug candidates can be determined from in vitro incubations with either hepatocytes or microsomes as described in Chapter 10.
Chapter 11 outlines methods for identifying oxidative metabolites using microsomes or S9 fractions. Chapter 12 describes a general approach identifying UGTs responsible for metabolizing a given drug candidate. CYP induction using human hepatocytes is described in Chapter 13.
Chapter 14 describes a high throughput approach screening for 13 individual CYPs by using fluorescent substrates and cDNA-expresed enzymes, and Chapter 15 presents a traditional method assessing the inhibition of those major CYPs in human liver microsomes. A systematic approach is given in Chapter 16 to identify mechanism –based CYP inhibitors.
In Chapter 17, detection of DNA adducts is described using 32P-postlabeling combining with PAGE or HPLC radioactive analysis; analysis of CYP-mediagted covalent DNA adducts is presented in Chapter 18.
Two methods detecting DNA damage at the level of individual eukaryotes induced by xenobiotics are provided including a traditional COMET (Chapter 19) and a rapid cell-based reporter system (Chapter 20). Although the Ames test has long been used to detect mutagens and possible carcinogens, an improved version assay given in Chapter 21 significantly reduces background resulting from contamination in S9 fractions. Also a modified mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) is outlined in Chapter 22, because this assay has been recommended as one of core toxicology tests.
As QT prolongation caused by interaction of drug molecules with HERG channels remains to be a common concern in drug discovery, a high throughput in vitro assay is devised in Chapter 23 to screen compounds for interaction with HERG. Reactive metabolites generated by CYPs can be trapped by the addition of glutathione to in vitro incubations and structurally characterized using mass spectrometry (Chapter 24). The last chapter presents a new in vitro assay assessing the reactivity of acylglucuronides (Chapter 25).
Each chapter contains introduction, materials, methods and notes sections. The introduction contains important background information. The materials section lists all the equipment and reagents necessary to carry out the assay, while step-by-step protocols are outlines in the methods section. The book is intended to serve a wide audience that includes all professionals involved in drug development.
Book Reviewed by: Raman Sehgal (M.S; Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences).

 

 

 

Title

: Drug Metabolism - Current Concepts

Author

: Cornia Ionescu and Mino R. Caira

Publishers

: Springer India Pvt. Ltd.

 

The book Drug Metabolism - Current Concepts is intended to serve a wide audience that includes undergraduate and postgraduate students of pharmacy, pharmacology, medicine, biochemistry, chemistry and related fields as well as other healthcare professionals and medicinal chemists.
In the first chapter, the principles underlying drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination are described in detail. Chapter 2 and 3 deals with the chemistry of the biotransformation reactions and includes both Phase 1 and Phase 2 reactions. Further details of the structural features, mechanism of action in biotransformation and enzyme regulation appear in Chapter 4. Enzyme induction, enzyme inhibition with special reference to Cytochrome P450 enzyme system is explained meticulously in chapter 5. This is followed, in Chapter 6, by a discussion of the factors affecting drug biotransformation. The authors have discussed influences of age, sex, hormonal status, diseased state. An introduction to relatively new discipline of Pharmacogenetics, probing the effect of gene variability on drug biotransformation is discussed in Chapter 7. This chapter covers implications of genetic variations for future drug dispensing. Chapter 8 discusses two important topics that have significant clinical implications namely drug interactions and adverse drug reactions. Finally chapter 9 attempts to demonstrate how principles of drug metabolism can be incorporated into the drug designing process to maximize the therapeutic efficacy of the molecule. This can be of paramount interest to the medicinal chemist for designing safe and efficacious candidates.
The text is supported extensively throughout by pertinent example to illustrate the principles and a special effort has been made to to include literature references of the recent studies and reviews which very well justifies the term ‘current’ in the title of this work.
Book Reviewed by: Raman Sehgal (M.Sc; Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences).

 

 

 

Title

: A Textbook of Pharmacy Practice

Author

: K. G. Revikumar and B. D. Miglani

Publishers

: Career Publications, Nashik

 

The origin of the medical education in India is attributable almost entirely to Indian Medical Service (IMS). Close to the independence of the country (1947), there were 19 colleges granting medical degrees. Every care was taken to put the Western system of medicine on strong footing, however, no serious government effort was made to produce pharmaceutical manpower of adequate quantity. There were chemists and druggists’ class run in medical colleges in Madras and Vishakapatnam, this being the only course in colonial India that was geared to provide qualified manpower for pharmacy practice. The course was run along with the lines of instructions imparted by Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. There was also a class of “compounders”, who were low-level practitioners of pharmacy and in some places the term dispenser was used for them. They had no formalized training until the process of education started in Bengal in 1881. The compounders were ill-paid and disparaged as professionals. In colonial days, the drugs and related items required to sustain the new medical systems had to be imported from overseas; the drug industry of India was at a rudimentary stage. Big pharmacy houses emerged that were generally managed by British pharmacists. Their customers were by and large Europeans. Many other chemists’ shops run by Indians sprang up for common man who could not afford higher prices. They were run by unqualified personals. Government hospitals did not have organised hospital pharmacies. The lowly paid compounders were engaged for dispensing and those who styled themselves as chemists and druggists were not formally trained. The apothecaries and hospital assistants had medico-pharmaceutical functions. As compared to Western countries like USA, England, Germany, pharmacy practice in India was in a very underdeveloped state. There was a desperate shortage of professional pharmacists. Such was India’s pharmaceutical inheritance from the colonial era. The Pharmacy Act of 1948 finally provided for the regulation and practice of pharmacy. The Pharmacy Council of India was constituted for the purpose of correcting the deplorable situation regarding the pharmacy practice.
Since 1960s, the Indian Hospital Pharmacists Association and its official mouthpiece, the Indian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy struggled hard to popularise and develop the hospital pharmacy, clinical pharmacy , community pharmacy and pharmacy practice in general. The efforts and the tireless devotion of Dr. B.D.Miglani are highly commendable and praiseworthy. He lectured on the subject of hospital pharmacy endlessly in many conferences in India and started M.Pharm course in hospital pharmacy in Delhi University in 1982. The introduction of subjects like hospital pharmacy, clinical pharmacy and community pharmacy in the B.Pharm curriculum (in 1980s), then starting of M.Pharm pharmacy practice course in a number of institutions during the latter part of 1990s and in the subsequent years and introduction of Pharm. D in 2008 are considered as milestones in the development and popularisation of pharmacy practice in India.
Till now not much reading material was available on pharmacy practice for the undergraduate and graduate students in India. The publication of this book “A Textbook of Pharmacy Practice” by Revikumar and Miglani is a great enrichment to the subject of pharmacy practice. A complete book devoted to all the aspects of pharmacy practice has been published in India for the first time. The book is divided in 12 Chapters: (1)Hospitals (2) Hospital Pharmacy (3) Community Pharmacy Services (4) Clinical Pharmacy (5) Medical Errors (6) Pharmacovigilance and Adverse Drug Reactions (7) Procurement, Storage, Inventory Control and Distribution of Medicines (8) Patient Counselling and Patient Compliance (9) Pharmacoepidemiology (10) Pharmacoeconomics and Quality of Life (11) Principles and Concepts of Research in Health Science and Pharmacy Practice (12) Professional Ethics in Pharmacy Practice.
Each Chapter is divided in subtitles and enriched with required, relevant and related information from the perspective of a pharmacy practice student. The authors have tried to link the various aspects of the hospital and clinical pharmacy into a reasonably coherent text. While writing this book and discussing the relevant and related issues, the authors have tried to give sufficient Indian orientation and wherever needed touched the situations in other countries so as to make the reader aware of the global and local situations. This textbook is well written giving details in each chapter, which makes the subject more understandable. Each chapter is supplemented with tables, illustrations and examples, which gives the reader clearer review of the text. At the end of each chapter a list of references is also quoted so that one gets an additional view of the literature. A glossary at the end of the book provides an excellent explanation of the scientific words and abbreviations used in this book which is an additional supplement to the knowledge of pharmacy practice. A few pictures make this book livelier. This book is a great enrichment to the profession of pharmacy in general and to pharmacy practice in particular. It should be recommended to all pharmacy professionals in the country and should become a part of the libraries in the pharmaceutical institutions, pharmaceutical industry, hospitals and other health institutions. It shall be of particular use, interest and applications to the pharmacy degree, postgraduate research, doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D) students in India and to the profession of pharmacy. I am convinced that this book will be accepted by pharmacy professionals and students as a worthwhile contribution to the subject pharmacy practice in India.
Book Reviewed by: Dr. Ravindernath Kaul, Germany

 

 

 

Title

: "Fundamentals of Clinical Research - Bridging medicine, statistics and operations"

Author

: A Bacchieri and G.D. Cioppa

Publishers

: Career Publications, Nashik, India

 

As India has been considered a destination point for off-shoring of clinical trials, clinical research, more so, the training of man-power has taken a driver`s seat in pharmaceutical development. A large number of academies have mushroomed recently for this purpose. Great many experts are involved in the training programmes. But only few have the real flavour of the intricacies of the subject of clinical research, least the fundamentals of Clinical Research.
The present book, describes the three basic pillars of clinical research namely, medicine, statistics and operations (the logistics of research). The real issues such as the choice of subjects, treatments, randomization and blinding, statistical analysis and inferences are very core to any clinical trial. The distinctive features of biomedical studies are the study protocol, sample size, characteristics of patients to be enrolled, treatment choice, reducing bias, cross-over design, parametric and non-parametric inferences. The book has indepth description on drug development process and various phases of clinical trials. While dealing with the subject matter, the authors have made a practical approach, in that they describe with examples and analyse which would help the beginners in biomedical research to understand and appreciate the importance of statistics in clinical research.
The book is divided into twelve chapters and each chapter is further divided in to several sections which makes the reader to understand the matter in an organised fashion.
The authors, one of them being a statistician (AB) and the other (GDC) is a physician, who come from diverse background and academic interest make an invincible `combo` in addressing a very complex subject of clinical research. They are one of the few scientists who have prepared numerous regulatory dossiers for pharmaceutical companies. The book is well organised and written in a user-friendly manners which will serve both the students and faculty of clinical research. It is recommended for all institutions/academies who are running such courses. It is also for the first time an Indian publishers (Career Publications) has the rights to distribute in India the publications of Springer, a global approach like the clinical research.

Book Reviewed by: S.K. Kulkarni, Professor of Pharmacology

 

 

 

Title

: ELEMENTS OF PHARMACOVIGILANCE

Author

: Raman Sehgal, Dr. Rajat Sethi & Dr. Shobha Rani R Hiremath

Publishers

: KONGPOSH Publications Pvt. Ltd. kongposhpub@gmail.com

 

India is now considered a hub for global clinical research. With increase in number of global clinical studies being carried out, there is also a need for developing an equally efficient and strong Pharmacovigilance system. The molecule undergoing clinical development has to demonstrate both safety and efficacy not only in clinical trials, but over a period of time. After the Vioxx tragedy and other recent high profile drug withdrawals, there is an elevated public concern regarding product safety post marketing. It is thus becoming imperative to proactively recognize the importance of risk identification and risk assessment in early in drug development process.
Pharmacovigilance, the last phase in the drug development, is critical to the protection of public health and involves continuous monitoring of the safe use of medicinal products. It is the science relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of the adverse effects of medicines. According to the World Health Organization, any Phamacovigilance programme should improve patient care and safety, encourage the safe and rational use of drugs and should assess the risk / benefit ratio.
The book entitled “Elements of Pharmacovigilance” gives a comprehensive view on various aspects of Pharmacovigilance. The individual authors have meticulously discussed some of the newer perspectives like Pharmacovigilance in Unani Medicine, dental products, over the counter (OTC) drugs, vaccines and the current scenario of herbal drug safety.
It should serve a comprehensive guide for all health care professionals, researchers, academicians and regulators. The authors and the publishers are to be commended for producing an excellent and timely resource for researchers and practitioners with an interest in this subject. 

Book Reviewed by Dr. Nilima A Kshirsagar

Dr. Nilima A Kshirsagar, Acting Vice Chancellor, Maharashtra Univrsity of Health Sciences, Nashik, Dean, ESIC, PGIMSR, Mumbai Emeritus Professor of Clinical Pharmacology G. S. Medical College, KEM Hospital Parel, Mumbai

 

 

 

Title

: SIR RAM NATH CHOPRA - Work, Vision and Legacy

Author

: Prof. Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan    Email: mail@vallabhprakashan.com

 

History of Pharmacy in India and Related Aspects, Volume 7 Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 4
Professor Harkishan Singh chose several years ago to explore the history of modern pharmacy in India, covering the span of the last few centuries, including the pharmaceutical progress in independent India. He has collected a great deal of historical material through his travels to different libraries in India and abroad and through considerable scholarly correspondence. I have visited his home in Chandigarh and seen the collection, which occupies two rooms in the upper floor of his house. In my opinion, it is the largest collection of literature on the pharmaceutical history of India under one roof, and Prof. Singh continues to expand the collection. With hard work and tireless devotion, Prof. Singh has contributed significantly to the field of the “History of Pharmacy in India and Related Aspects.” His standing as a science historian has been recognised in his election to the prestigious Académie International d’Historie de la Pharmacie. He has published six books so far on this subject: Volume 1: Pharmacopoeias and Formularies (1994); Volume 2: Pharmaceutical Education (1998); Volume 3: Pharmacy Practice (2002); Volume 4: Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 1 Mahadeva Lal Schroff and the Making of Modern Pharmacy (2005); Volume 5: Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 2 (2008); Volume 6: Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 3 Medico-Pharmaceutical Professionals (2009).
Prof. Singh now presents his latest book in this series Volume 7: Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 4. This monograph is devoted to Sir Ram Nath Chopra, his work, vision and legacy. In the earlier Volume 6, the author has described the life and contributions of R.N.Chopra. Volume 7 is mainly a compilation, reproducing as in original the historical addresses delivered and writings on scientific and professional topics of Chopra. A part of pioneering research paper on Rauwolfia by Chopra and his work on drug addiction is reproduced in this book. An article written by Chopra about problems and prospects of pharmacology career in India with his own experiences in life is also reprinted here. Articles by his disciple Dr. B. Mukerji (to whom this book is dedicated) on his preceptor’s role as crusader of pharmacology and promoter of pharmacy as well as a consolidated list of Chopra’s publications is also appended in this book. Among the men who have adorned the Indian medical profession in the 20th century, Sir Ram Nath Chopra occupies the foremost position. He was pioneer in the study of indigenous drugs in India and an outstanding luminary in the field of medical education and research. He is widely acclaimed as the Father of Indian Pharmacology. His glory was that of a pioneer and a crusader blazing the trial in a so far untrodden field, full of potentialities. Chopra was elected as a Fellow of practically all the scientific bodies and educational organisations in India, including National Academy of Sciences. In 1925, he was elected President of the Medical and Veterinary Research Section of Indian Science Congress and again in 1938 the President of the Physiology Section during the jubilee session. He was President of Indian Science Congress held in Patna in 1948.
Prof. Singh has compiled in this book 10 addresses delivered by Chopra on various occasions at the scientific Congresses. Chopra lectured on various subjects and gave expressions to his view and experiences on the subjects of pharmacology and related sciences, indigenous drugs, Indian systems of medicine, pharmaceutical developments and other varied topics. In his addresses, he referred also to Drugs Enquiry Committee (1930-31), which he chaired. The report of this committee made cogent recommendations, which paved the way for the drugs and pharmacy legislations, pharmacopoeial publications and development of the pharmacy profession. After going through these lectures delivered by Chopra and his writings, one gets an impression of his deep knowledge, his vision and the concepts he presented for the development of the medical and pharmaceutical profession in India. He wanted the utilisation of the local resources for the indigenous production of drugs so as to reach the masses of India at lower prices and, thus reduce the cost of treatment of diseases.
The pioneer work done by Chopra and associates on Rauwolfia serpentine, Benth referred in one chapter of this book, gained prominence two decades later as a source of reserpine. In 1933, it was reported by his group that an alkaloid obtained from the plant on experimental studies in animals showed central depressant properties and lowered the blood pressure.
The works of Chopra on drug addiction and wide spread abuse of such drugs as opium, cannabis, cocaine and alcohol which was prevalent in many parts of India, attracted international attention. He produced a wealth of material to combat and treat their deleterious effects, all worth reading material in this book.
Another chapter in this book volume is the description by Chopra about the problems and prospects of pharmacological career in India with his own experiences in life. He writes about his studies in England and his work in pharmacology with Walter E. Dixon, the first Professor of Pharmacology in the newly established Chair in Cambridge. His enthusiasm to work on this subject on his return back to India came after a decade when he got the first Chair of the Pharmacology in the newly opened School of Tropical Medicine, Calcutta. His pioneer work on indigenous drugs and the disease problems in India which he later carried in Drug Research laboratory, Jammu are of educative value and worth reading in this book. Prof. Singh has presented in appendices I and II, the original writings of B.Mukerji about Sir Ram Nath Chopra and the growth and development of pharmacology and pharmacy in India; all very excellent tutorial material. The author has also given a complete list of publications of Chopra (more than 400) in appendix III, a very impressive record of Chopra’s work.
This volume written by Prof. Singh like others in the series is rigorously researched and meticulously referred. This book is very well written and the lectures and other great works of Chopra are nicely complied. By reading this book and the lectures of Chopra, one gets a fairly good impression as how much problems India faced both in the medical and pharmaceutical fields in the first half of the 20th century. The contributions of Chopra and other builders and awareness creators of modern pharmacy have created that illumination, the fruits of which we are enjoying today in the medical and the pharmaceutical progress of India. This book should be very much recommended to the pharmaceutical and drug professional in the universities and the industries as well as to all the pharmaceutical and drug authorities in India and abroad. This book volume also teaches us that the great works and dreams of Sir Ram Nath Chopra are still to be realized so as to make India self sufficient in health sector.

 
Book Reviewed by Dr. Ravindernath Kaul, Germany

 

 

 

Title

: HOW TO PRACTICE - GLP

Author

: P.P. Sharma

Publishers

: Vandana Publications Pvt. Ltd. LU-56, Vishakha Enclave, Delhi-110 088

 

Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) is a quality system concerned with the organizational process and conditions under which non-clinical health and environmental safety studies are conducted. This system, which has been evolved by the member countries of Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), helps to ensure the quality of data produced by laboratories by harmonizing the practices and provides international acceptance to safety data generated in GLP-certified test facilities.
The book, ‘How to Practice GLP’ authored by Sh. P. P. Sharma, former Dy. Drugs Controller, Delhi is a comprehensive volume on different aspects of GLP.
The book starts with a good introduction which talks about the evolution of GLP. The book has 7 well written chapters and the author has very meticulously shared his expertise. In this book the author has described all concepts, terminologies, guidelines and different approaches in GLP. Chapter 1 deals with basic concepts in Quality. In Chapter 2, the author talks in detail about inspection and its planning. Chapter 3 goes deep into the sampling and sampling plans. Chapter 4 describes an important area of Statistical Quality control. Chapter 5 explains the quality of analytical methodologies and analytical method validation. Chapter 6 deals with concepts in safety planning and management and bio-safety and related emergency procedures and Chapter 7 is all about the practice of GLP in general that also includes premises, personnel, equipment SOPs etc.
Some of the highlights of the book are:

  • Texts of several GLPs are reproduced including draft Indian GLP (Schedule L-1), OECD GLP and USFDA GLP.

  • List of OECD publications on principles of GLP

  • “How to” guidelines for GLP implementation.

  • Information on National GLP Compliance Monitoring Authority.

  • Chapters on basic concepts like Quality, Inspection, Sampling and statistical quality control (SQC)

  • Appendices also include list of hazardous and toxic chemicals as laid down in the Chemical and Accidents (Emergency Planning Preparedness and Response) Rules, 1996 – Schedule I, Text of Breeding of and Experiments on Animals (Control and Supervision) Rules, 1998

The patient will always want to have a drug that is of good quality, pure, safe and efficacious. The author has done a commendable job by writing a book on an area that is so vital to the consumer. He deserves all appreciation and congratulations. This book will be useful for professionals involved in drug testing labs, Quality control, faculty and students of pharmacy, drug regulatory officers and other consultants.
Book Reviewed by Raman Sehgal, Associate Editor, The Pharma Review, New Delhi, India (MSc; Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences). 

 

 

 

Title

: MODERN DISPENSING PHARMACY

Author

: Atmaram Pawar, R.S. Gaud

Publishers

: Career Publications Website: www.careerandyou.com

 

Modern Dispensing Pharmacy

 

The authors of the book entitled “Modern Dispensing Pharmacy” (3rd Edition) published by Career Publications, Hyderabad has discussed the subject in 20 chapters (articles) covered in 430 pages and also contains an appendix. The overall presentation of the book is very good. Objective of the book is to preserve the basics of the art of compounding while adding modern concepts of dispensing pharmacy. In the revised third edition, book covers development of pharmacy, role of pharmacist as health care provider, prescription writing & prescription handling, art of compounding, concepts of dispensing pharmacy, compounding & dispensing of different pharmaceutical dosage forms etc. Wherever required, pictograms, tables and graphics have been provided for better understanding of the subject. In addition to point wise and schematic presentation, the description of every point is summarized under Concept Clear, which facilitates the subject understanding. Though rich by content, the overall presentation of the book is not quite impressive. At page 15 and from page 129 to 132, the prescriptions in boxes are not readable. Figure 18.6 at P. 374 was shady. Despite these little drawbacks, this book is expected to be useful for budding pharmacists as well as educators and practicing pharmacists.

 
Book reviewed by Mr. R. K. Rishi

 

 

 

Title

: CONCEPTS IN CHRONOPHARMACOLOGY

Author

: N. Udupa, P.D. Gupta

Publishers

: Shyam Prakashan E-mail: ankit_146@sify.com Website: www.shyamprakashan.com

 

Concepts on Chronopharmacology

 
Metabolic fate of drug is a function of time. The importance of 'Chronopharmacology' is now being felt in almost all branches of pharmaceutical sciences including drug design, drug development, bioavailability, efficacy, toxicology and administration. In Ayurveda, the importance of circadian rhythm was well recognized since ancient times and the medicines were prescribed to a patient with due consideration to time. Recently, pharmacologists have discovered that drugs when given with body rhythms showed not only synergistic effects but also caused fewer side effects. We all know sleeping pills should be taken at night for maximum effects.

The book entitled "Concepts in Chronopharmacolgy" is a well written book with an aim to impress upon the importance of 'time' in pharmaceutical sciences. In Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 the author talks about the importance of Chronopharmacokinetics and Chronopharmacodynamics of the drugs. Different contributing authors have very interestingly discussed the role of biological clock in Infectious diseases, human reproduction, cardiovascular disorders, respiratory disorders, diabetes, cancer, psychiatric disorders. A chapter each on Chronotherapy and Chronotoxicology is very interesting. The seasonal rhythms are very well exhibited in figures throughout the book. After reading the book, one can easily conclude the message given to the readers 'receiving an apt medication at right form, at right dose and also at
the right TIME'. I would like to congratulate both the editors and senior researchers Dr. N. Udupa and Dr. P. D Gupta for bringing out such a wonderful compilation on a rare but interesting topic.
I sincerely hope it will be very useful to all pharmaceutical professionals.

 
Book reviewed by Dr. Rajat Sethi, Assistant Professor, Texas A &M Health Science Center, College of Pharmacy, Kingsville, Texas and Raman Sehgal, MS Pharmacology (AIIMS, India)

 

 

 

Title

: Pharmacognosy & Phytochemistry

Author

: Dr. Vinod D. Rangari

Publishers

: Career Publications E-mail: publications@careerandyou.com Website: www.careerandyou.com

 

Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry Volume-I

 
Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry - volume 1 book is an updated version of First edition and is much improved both in qualitative and quantitative aspects. This book provides deep information and understanding of the subject Pharmacognosy and various drugs of Natural origin. The book is divided into 21 chapters dealing with introduction of Phannacognosy, its linkage with Pharmaceutical botany and details of commercial and quality control aspects of herbals which are well desired these days. The book provides sufficient knowledge for the microscopical analysis and processing of crude drugs. Further, the book has a chapter on Extraction and isolation of phytoconstituents where the information is found less sufficient and some latest isolation and purification techniques can be added in detail. However, the chapters on Biosynthetic pathways and elucidation techniques and remaining chapters on Fixed oils and fats, carbohydrates, Glycosides, Tannins, volatile oils, Resins, Alkaloids, Enzymes, Drugs of mineral origin, Natural fibres are very well written giving the most relevant information on classification, biosynthesis, chemical tests, production, quality control aspects and related individual drugs details. One chapter on Drugs from marine sources should also have been included.

The printing and binding of book, presentation of chapters and design of cover page is very impressive. Figures, sketches and chemical structures are suitably and sufficiently incorporated. Language of the book is simple, understandable and with comparatively less topographic mistakes.
Moreover, author of the book, Prof. Vinod D. Rangari, Principal, J. L. Chaturvedi College of Pharmacy, Nagpur, has a good reputation in the field of herbal research. His vast experience in the field of herbal standardisation has been reflected well in the presentation of this book which has made it different from all other text books written on this subject.
This book will be more useful and will serve as the text book for the students of undergraduate level. Students can find sufficient and updated information on the topics they need in their curriculum. Few chapters like Commerce and quality control, Production of crude drugs, General Biosynthetic pathways and techniques for elucidation ofbiosynthetic pathways will also be useful for postgraduate students.

 
Overall, the book Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry - volume 1 is well written with sufficient information which will be of great use for undergraduate students of Pharmacy.

 
Book reviewed by Prof. S.H. Ansari, Dean, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi

 

 

 

Title

: Dictionary of Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology

Author

: Mr. J.P.S. Kohli

Publishers

: Business Horizons Pharmaceutical Publishers  Website: www.businesshorizons.com

 

Pharmaceutical Science is fast evolving entity and encompasses diverse fields like anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, botany, chemistry, formulation, engineering, marketing etc. More recently, biotechnology too has become an undeniable part of pharmaceutical industry.
We come across new words on a daily basis and are frequently in need of a resource that we can refer in times of need.
The author has very meticulously used his experience in the pharmaceutical industry and has presented latest technological terms that are often encountered today. The author has aptly given more thrust on current and contemporary knowledge rather than history and origin of pharmaceutical sciences.
The "Dictionary of Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology" would be of immense help to undergraduate and post graduate students of pharmacy, biotechnology, medicine, nursing and allied health sciences. In addition, it will also serve as a reference material for pharmaceutical and biotech industry.
I congratulate Dr. Kohli, a senior member of the Indian pharmaceutical industry for coming out with an updated dictionary that combines the intertwined fields of pharmaceuticals and biotechnology.

 
Dictionary reviewed by: Dr Rajat Sethi (Assistant Professor, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, A&M Health Science Center, Texas)

 

 

 

Title

: Bioharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics A Treatise

Author

: Dr. D. M. Brahmankar and Dr. Sunil B. Jaiswal

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, E-mail: mail@vallabhprakashan.com 

 

Over a period of time, pharmaceutical science has evolved from mere compounding and dispensing of drugs. Recent advances in understanding disease and genetic make-up have necessitated the need to optimize and individualize drug therapy. The concern today is to produce a dosage form which is not only pharmaceutically elegant, but releases the drug at the target site at a desired rate and uniformly maintains the extent of absorption. Thus, the twin disciplines of Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics play a critical role in drug development.
This textbook "Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics – A Treatise" by Dr. Brahmankar and Dr Jaiswal has 15 very well written chapters. The chapter on Absorption of Drugs has been dealt with comprehensively as most of its principles also form the basis of drug distribution and elimination. Elaborate treatment of text on Biotransformation of Drugs in Chapter 5 is justified since a pharmacy student is well versed with the basic chemistry and enzymology. A brief mention about Bioactivation and Tissue Toxicity has been included at the end of this chapter so that after understanding the mechanisms of drug metabolism, a student will be better placed to appreciate their significance. Prodrugs discussed in chapter 6 give insight into the manner in which chemical formulation techniques can be utilized to overcome some of the inherent Biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetic problems of the active principles. Mathematical treatment of chapter on pharmacokinetics has been kept to at modest level in order not to overburden the students with the complexities of equations and formulae. A brief description of methods usually employed to enhance the bioavailability of a drug from its formulation has been included at the end of chapter 12. In addition to covering various aspects of design and dosage regimens and application of pharmacokinetic principles in clinical situations, the text contains a final chapter on Controlled Release Medication to familiarize the students with the principles involved in the design of innovative formulations.
The authors have used very simple language for easy grasp of the subject. Also, simple figures and tables are liberally used throughout the book for better understanding. In addition, revision questions including numericals at the end of each chapter are designed strategically to complement the text of the chapter.
The book would be of immense help to B. Pharm, M. Pharm and PhD students.
I would like to congratulate the authors for an excellent attempt to address one of the dynamic areas of drug research.

 
Book Reviewed by:  by Raman Sehgal, Senior Clinical Research Scientist; ICON Clinical Research Pvt. Ltd., M.S. (Pharmacology); All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

 

 

 

Title

: History of Pharmacy in India and Related Aspects, Volume 5
  Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 2

Author

: Prof. Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, E-mail: mail@vallabhprakashan.com 

 

As compared to western countries, we in India are hardly aware of our history of pharmacy, development of our institutions and of builders and creators of these temples of learning. The fact is that not much literature was available to the pharmacy professionals in our country. Professor Harkishan Singh, a prominent medicinal chemist and a pharmaceutical historian of international repute has done pioneer work by doing intensive research on the pharmaceutical history both in pre- and post-independence period of India. With tremendous zeal, hard work and tireless devotion, the author has given birth to a new topic "History of Pharmacy in India and Related Aspects". He has summarised his efforts with his archival collections (bound into more than 1200 volumes) in various monographs: Volume 1 Pharmacopoeias and Formularies, Volume 2 Pharmaceutical Education, Volume 3 Pharmacy Practice. These books have revolutionized understanding the history of pharmacy in India of last 200 hundred years and given Indian science valuable documents untraced or unknown so far.

 
The present progress of pharmacy education, pharmaceutical profession and industrial developments in India is the concentrated efforts of many intellectuals and visionaries of the country. Prof. Singh has not missed to write the biographies and achievements of these great men, whom he describes as "Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy". In the book History of Pharmacy and Related Aspects Volume 4, Series1 (2005), he has published the biography of Mahedeva Lal Schroff, the father of modern pharmaceutical education in India. Prof. Schroff laid the foundation of pharmacy education from 1932 -1943 at Banaras Hindu University (BHU). Besides this, he took active part in various pharmaceutical professional bodies in the Govt. of India and in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in the promotion of pharmaceutical journalism.

 
Prof. Singh has done biographical studies of many more prominent pharmaceutical luminaries, who worked tirelessly for the profession of pharmacy in the country. He has now published Volume 5, Series 2 of the builders and awareness creators of modern pharmacy. 12 luminaries have been selected and a chapter is dedicated to each of them. Each one of them made significant contributions for organisation of the profession, development of the pharmaceutical education and sciences, industry, statutory control on drugs and pharmacy, pharmacy practice and other aspects of pharmacy.

 
The responsibility of guiding the pharmacy department at BHU was given in 1943 to Nitai Krishna Basu, who further organised the pharmaceutical education and laid the firm foundation of the pharmacy studies in the country. He was assisted in his mission by three other devoted faculty members, Dhirendra Nath Majumdar, Gurakh Prasad Srivastava and Sankatha Prasad. They all worked together to make BHU the first temple of learning and a place of pilgrimage for pharmacist. With spirited zeal and devotion, these four missionaries of Indian pharmacy continued to serve the cause of education and profession and stayed in the department till superannuation. During this period the department of pharmaceutics at BHU attained the status of world level institution of pharmaceutical education and research. The author has written the life and works of these four great pioneers of pharmacy and sacrifices they made for the profession in 4 separate chapters. No other person can better describe their contribution than Prof Singh, since he himself was a student and a faculty member at BHU.

 
The most significant contribution of Ratilal Prabhudas Patel has been the creation and building of Lallabhai Motilal College of Pharmacy at Ahmedabad, the growth and destiny of which he guided for 17 years. He was professionally very active and served the cause through the medium of Indian Pharmaceutical Association and Pharmacy Council of India. All these constitute an impressive set of credentials but, in spite of that, he did not get an appropriate place in the history of Indian pharmacy. The author has paid rich tributes to him and mentioned at the end of the chapter, "The name of this prominent pioneer of pharmacy deserves to be rehabilitated".

 
Manohar Lal Khorana was an academician, a complete pharmaceutical scientist, associated with professional and statutory bodies. His works and achievements in promoting pharmacy journalism and his other contributions to the pharmacy profession in India are worth reading in this book.

 
The life works and efforts of Surendra Nath Biswas, an enlightened Calcutta based chemist and druggist and a well-read and well-informed professional of India is briefly but precisely described. Biswas expressed about the lack of education of chemists and druggists and formalised education for the pharmacists. He struggled for upgrading the pharmacy profession and working conditions of pharmacists in the country and wrote endlessly on the subject.

 
Keshab Chandra Chatterjee distinguished himself as a prominent pharmacy leader. His role in the pharmaceutical industry and allied aspects, consolidating the Indian Pharmaceutical Association, Pharmacy Act and Pharmaceutical Services are highly recognised. He was an educationist and a man of many parts.

 
Homi Ruttonji Nanajee was an educationist, worked in professional and statutory bodies and contributed to pharmacy practice and worked in professional forums. His leading role in drugs control, in drug analysis as analyst, and promotion of drug industry are well known and recognised. Prof. Singh has given a realistic contribution of this great son of pharmacy in 32 pages with 7 historical pictures.

 
Bhupendra Vallabhbhai Patel left deep impression in building modern pharmacy in India. His role in pioneering the development and consolidation of the pharmacy profession has been applauded. He graduated in pharmacy and became an accomplished pharmacologist. Prof. Singh has described in detail the role B.V. Patel played in pharmaceutical forums, statutory bodies and pharmacy practice, structuring the drugs control and promotion of pharmaceutical education. He left a deep impact in the building of modern pharmacy in India. His accomplishments are so great that the author has dedicated 34 pages on him in his book.

 
The contribution of Baij Nath Vyas, a pharmacologist by profession as the first president of the United Provinces Pharmaceutical Association and later named as Indian Pharmaceutical Association are briefly but well recorded. India lost in him one of the foremost physicians of the country, first President of Indian Pharmaceutical Association and its promoter, an ardent supporter of pharmaceutical education and profession.

 
Prof. Singh has dedicated this book to the memory of Jyotish Chandra Ghosh, "the forgotten and unsung pioneer of pharmacy" and written one chapter on him. Very little was known of this man in the pharmacy history of India and he practically faded away quickly from the memory of the profession. J.C.Ghosh made significant contributions toward pharmaceutical and allied fields. His contributions include the areas of pharmaceutical and technological education, indigenous drugs, pharmaceutical and chemical industry and drugs and pharmaceutical legislations. The author has made great efforts to trace the life and works of this man from different archives in India and abroad and rediscovered this great luminary of Indian pharmacy.

 
The author has done great service to the profession of pharmacy by publishing this volume. The book is excellently written and it is a treasure for the pharmacy profession of India. It is a rigorously researched book volume. Prof. Singh is known to be very thorough in writing detail and each chapter is well referenced. In the appendices the speeches of some luminaries are also recorded, which makes the reader understand the problems of the pharmacy professions in the initial years of India's independence. This book should be very much recommended to the pharmaceutical and drug professionals in the universities and the industries as well as to all the pharmaceutical and drug authorities in the country. This book also teaches us that a few great men have made pharmacy in India.

  
Book Reviewed by: Dr Ravindernath Kaul, Germany

 

 

 

Title

: History of Pharmacy in India and Related Aspects, Volume 6

  Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 3

Author

: Prof. Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, E-mail: mail@vallabhprakashan.com 

 

Professor Harkishan Singh has continued his research on profiling the lives and contributions of the pharmaceutical luminaries who laid the foundation of pharmacy education and profession in the country. He now presents his latest book on History of Pharmacy in India and Related Aspects Volume 6, Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy 3 under subtitle: Medico-Pharmaceutical Professionals.
Several medico-pharmaceutical professionals have contributed to pharmaceutical developments in India. Brevet Colonel Sir Ram Nath Chopra and his onetime associates Professor Khem Singh Grewal and Dr Bhishnupada Mukerji stand for their direct involvement in the building of modern pharmacy in India. Not only did they distinguish themselves as pharmacologists, their role in making of modern pharmacy was equally important. Prof. Singh has profiled the lives and achievements of these medico-pharmaceutical professionals in this volume and devoted one chapter to each of them. This book is dedicated to the memory of Brevet Col. Sir Ram Nath Chopra, "parent of pharmacology, pioneer of systematic studies of indigenous drugs, promoter of Indian systems of medicine and patron of pharmacy". The major field of Col. Chopra´s research were general pharmacology, chemotherapy, indigenous drugs, drug addiction and drug assays. Brevet Col. Sir Ram Nath Chopra, a legendary medico-pharmaceutical professional has left behind a rich legacy. Prof. Singh has paid rich tributes to this titan of Indian medical sciences.
Professor Khem Singh Grewal was an accomplished pharmacologist of his time. He had varied research interests including the study of medicinal plants. He participated in carrying out comprehensive survey on incidence of cancer in India. His most conspicuous pharmaceutical contribution is the founding of pharmaceutical education at the University of Panjab, Lahore. A continuum of Lahore centre is now the famous University Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Panjab University, Chandigarh, which stands as a living memorial to the pioneering Grewal. The author has highly commended the sacrifices and achievements of Prof. Khem Singh Grewal in the development of pharmacy in India during the difficult pre- and post- independence period of Punjab.
Dr Bishnupada Mukerji was the builder of the Biochemical Standardisation Laboratory and the statutory Central Drugs Laboratory, Calcutta. He conceptualized the creation of a national institute of drug research, which led to the establishment of the Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, the development of which Dr Mukerji guided for a number of years as the director. Dr Mukerji significantly helped the developments of pharmacology and there is no part of the pharmaceutical activity in which he did not leave an enduring impact. Prof. Singh writes at the end of the chapter "Looking to his role in building pharmacology and pharmacy, undeniably Dr Bishnupada Mukerji stands tall as a medico-pharmaceutical professional of great merit of our land.”
This book like the previous volumes in the series is rigorously researched and meticulously referred. The chapters are well documented with subtitles describing the phases of education, academic achievements and the contributions of these luminaries in the pharmaceutical developments of India. Some historical pictures make this book very interesting to read. In the appendices, important speeches of B.Mukerjee and R.N. Chopra at various conferences are well recorded. Unluckily there is no record of K.S.Grewals`s papers, as most of the documents seem to have been left behind in Lahore at the time of partition. This volume book should be a part of the libraries of pharmaceutical and medical institutions and should be very much recommended to the pharmaceutical and medical professionals in India and abroad. This book is also meant for health politicians as reference background to understand as how medical and pharmacy professionals have to work together to solve the health problems of our masses. The great contributions of these three medico-pharmaceutical professional souls and other builders and awareness creators of modern pharmacy have created that illumination, the fruits of which we are enjoying today in the pharmaceutical progress of India.

 
Book Reviewed by: Dr Ravindernath Kaul, Germany

 

 

 

Title

: Dispensing Pharmacy

Author

: Mr. R. M. Mehta

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, LU-56, Vishakha Enclave, Delhi-110 088

 

Academicians around the world have a professional obligation to ensure that dispensing chemists / pharmacy assistants are competent enough in the areas in which they are working to a minimum prescribed standard.

 
Thus, the demand for a simple, standard and a complete textbook on Dispensing pharmacy for pharmacy students at diploma / degree level has been felt for a long time.

 
This textbook “Dispensing Pharmacy” by R. M. Mehta has various well written chapters on General dispensing procedures, labeling of dispensed products, containers and closures used for various dosage forms and Posology.

 
Chapter 7 in the textbook discusses various Solid dosage forms (Tablets, Capsules, Pills, Lozenges, Powders etc) in detail. Chapter 8, 9 and 10 deals with Monophasic (both preparations for internal and external use) and Biphasic liquid dosage forms (Suspensions and emulsions).
Chapter on Semi-solid dosage forms (ointments, pastes, jellies, creams etc) gives an overview of the method of preparation, differences amongst various semi solid dosage forms, additives used in formulation, applications, their merits and demerits and incorporates formula for some of the official pharmacopoeial preparations.

 
Chapter on Ophthalmic and Sterile dosage forms discusses eye preparations like eye drops, eye ointments, eye lotions, eye suspensions, essential characteristics of these dosage forms, types of parenteral solutions, their formulation etc in detail. The chapter also enlists the various sterility tests carried out as per the pharmacopeia.

 
Also, this book can also serve as a manual for practical for dispensing pharmacy for both Diploma and B. Pharma students.
In addition, the chapter on Pharmaceutical calculations, incompatibilities in prescriptions and additives is an additional feature of the book.
Following the chapters, the book also incorporates some useful appendices. Appendix 1 and 2 discusses the human and veterinary doses of drugs respectively; their uses and preferred route of administrations. Appendix 3 of the book contains a list of references recommended for further reading.
 

Some of the salient features of the book include:

  • Very simple language for easy grasp of the subject.

  • Vivid diagrams and illustrations for better understanding of the subject.

  • Revision questions at the end of each chapter.

The book would be of immense help to undergraduate and post graduate pharmacy students and related disciplines of medicine and nursing.
I would like to congratulate the author for an excellent compilation on Dispensing Pharmacy.

 
Book Reviewed by: Raman Sehgal, Senior Clinical Research Scientist; ICON Clinical Research Pvt. Ltd.
                                     M.S. (Pharmacology); All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

 

 

 

Title

: Looking into Living Things... Through MRI

Author

: Dr R S Chaughule, Dr S S Ranade

Publishers

: Prism Publications, 15/4, Shivpuri, Near Chembur Naka, S.T. Road, Chembur,

  Mumbai-400 071.E-mail: ajitn@vsnl.com

 

MRI Spectroscopy was discovered by Felix Bloch (Stanford University) and Edward Mills Purcell (Harvard University) way back in 1946. Since the 1980s, MRI has grown to be an indispensable tool in the medical diagnosis of many maladies especially of soft tissue, such as the brain and spine. Its application to biomedical sciences and subsequently in the field of life sciences, agriculture, geological sciences, food technology is noteworthy.

 
The book “Looking into living things through MRI” covers a very wide range of systems and phenomena, and will not only inform the reader about the less familiar areas, but will suggest new ideas useful in human medicine.
The chapter on Wood discusses the process of drying of young wood, giving an account of water movement from central vascular tissue elements and exit route by capillary process, resulting in final product wood. This is immensely readable scientific account of wood structure as seen by MRI.

 
The book has well written chapters on applications of MRI in various fields like food science where the authors have meticulously described how this technique can be used in a simple and efficient way to monitor the quality of apples, citrus fruit and wine grapes. Other applications discussed in the book include providing new possibilities of exploring seafood, meat structure and ripening process of Iberian Ham by MRI.

 
Chapter 8 provides an insight into Bread making process from dough stage to baked product. The chapter also reviews 'croissants' and 'sandwich' structure. One is also taken to cellular level of organization of living things by MR Spectroscopy.

 
Chapter on MRCP (Magnetic Resonance Cholangio Pancreatography) shows MRI in clinical scenario; chapter on new MRI pulse sequences provides research angle. Likewise, Lithium in mammalian systems explores possibilities with other magnetic nuclei amenable to MRI.

 
Chapter on MR study of implantology illustrates new application of MRI in the field of dentistry. A chapter on clinical application of MRI discusses the use of this technique in oncology, lungs. The difficulties faced in respect of proton imagine such as motional artifacts are reduced with the help of asymmetric imaging and rapid line scan and the study of lung diseases like pulmonary edema and emphysema are also presented.

 
The book also has a well written MRI on Nanotechnology on which discusses nanomagnetic probes for bioimaging. The authors have provided extensive examples, rich bibliography, scans, illustrations and graphs where ever required.

 
This is an informative, admirable and much overdue book that provides insights into diverse life forms. The book for the first time provides a glimpse of the clinical and non-clinical applications. I would like to congratulate the author and the experts for an excellent compilation.

 
Book Reviewed by: Dr. Anshu Rohatgi, Senior Consultant Neurologist, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi

 

 

 

Title

: Views & Reviews

Author

: Prof. Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: APTI, Bangalore, Tel.: 080-22234619 Fax: 22225834,   E-mail: aptialerts@yahoo.com

 

Last year when I went to Banaras University campus to attend the 59th IPC In December 2007, I was most happy to meet Prof Harkishan Singh " A Mine of Information on Pharmaceutical Sciences and History". He was introduced to me by another master of pharmaceutical education, Dr. B.D. Miglani whom I have known for many years through our interaction in the journal - Eastern Pharmacist which closed down some years ago.

 
The contents of Prof. Harkishan Singh's book Views and Reviews is a compilation of over 100 articles which he has written, from the article titled "Research in Pharmacy" published in Pharma student (BHU) in 1954 to"Education at Punjab University" published in the souvenir of the 12th APTI Convention at Chandigarh in 2007.
 

These articles provide you with the story of the rise and transformation of the Indian Pharma Industry / Academia in the last 50 years, including the various associations / Organisations / Committees formed during this period and where they stand today.

 
But the best part of this " Mine of Information" are the chapters dealing with Who's Who's of the Pharmaceutical Academia in India, pharmacists who have contributed and helped the industry to reach where it stands today, an industry of Global Standing. If not for Prof. Harkishan Singh's articles on them, most of these stalwarts would have been forgotten. This well documented book form Prof. Harkishan Singh must not only find a place in all Pharmaceutical College libraries in India as well as abroad but also as a reference book in all other libraries where people want to know about the India Pharma Academia.

 
Book Reviewed by: Mr. Triloki Bazaz, Consultant, The Pharma Review

 

 

 

Title

: Cosmetics-Formulation, Mfg. & Quality Control

Author

: P.P. Sharma

Publishers

: Vandana Publications Pvt. Ltd. LU-56, Vishakha Enclave, Delhi-110 088

 

Cosmetics are so extensively used articles that their use begins with rising from the bed in the morning (e.g. toothpaste/ toothpowder) till late in the evening while going to bed (e.g. night creams). This calls for them to be of good quality. Books help in improving quality of the products.

 

The book, Cosmetics-Formulation, Mfg. & Quality Control authored by Sh. P. P. Sharma, former Dy. Drugs Controller, Delhi is a comprehensive volume on different aspects of cosmetics. Besides introduction which contains history of development of cosmetics, the book has eight parts. Part one deals with regulatory provisions, plant layout for cosmetics manufacture, theoretical aspects of processes used in the manufacture of cosmetics, commonly used raw materials and an important chapter on minimization of microbial contamination in cosmetics. Part two deals with cosmetics for skin. Part three deals with cosmetics for hair. Part four deals with cosmetics for the eyes. Part five deals with the cosmetics for the nails. Part six deals with the cosmetics for the teeth. Part seven deals with miscellaneous cosmetics like fragrances, aerosols, toilet soaps, baby cosmetics and now a days sought after cosmetics-herbal cosmetics. Part eight deals with quality control of cosmetics. This part is very important from the point of view of safety of consumers.

 

The author has aptly written chapters giving general information about a cosmetic category, formulation considerations including likely characteristics of finished cosmetics by using ingredients which have functional uses like moisturizer, emollient, cleansing etc., general methods of manufacture of cosmetics and also specific methods of manufacture if the method has intricacies of chemical reaction or safety problems. Some of the highlights of the book are:

 

  • a chapter on herbal cosmetics including list of herbs, methods of decoction, extracts flower waters etc.;

  • a chapter on baby cosmetics; l a chapter on fragrances including essential oils, synthetic aromatic chemicals, fixation, compounding, maturing etc.;

  • a chapter on toilet soap including methods of manufacture of soaps, characteristics of soaps and different types of soaps;

  • a chapter on hypoallergenic cosmetics;

  • a chapter on quality control of cosmetics citing Indian standards for cosmetics;

  • a chapter on stability of cosmetics including parameters for tests and methodology;

  • appendices listing names of some machinery manufacturers and trade names of chemicals of some indigenous and some foreign manufacturers.

The author has done a commendable job by writing a book on cosmetics right from plant layout to formulation to manufacture to quality control and stability studies. He deserves appreciation and congratulations. With a wide area of information on cosmetics, this book will be useful for cosmetic chemists, faculty and students of pharmacy, drug regulatory officers and consultants.

 
Book Reviewed by: Dr. P.D. Sethi, Pharma Analyst

 

 

 

Title

: Oral Lipid-Based Formulations: Enhancing the Bioavailability of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs

Author

: David J. Hauss

Publishers

: Informa Healthcare Inc., New Yourk, NY 10017, Website: www.informahealthcare.com

 

Oral delivery of nearly one-half of the drug compounds gets thwarted owing to their high lipophilicity and consequently poor aqueous solubility. Oral bioavailability of such drugs, being function of their aqueous solubility and dissolution, tends to exhibit low magnitude and high intra- and inter-subject variability.
Oral lipid-based drug delivery systems have proved their immense potential in ameliorating the poor and inconsistent gastrointestinal absorption of poorly soluble drugs. Of late, an alarmingly high spurt of various literature instances and marketed products of such lipid-based formulations has been witnessed across the global pharma world. Despite the immense utilities of the lipid-based drug formulations, only limited reviews have been published dedicated to this specialized topic till date. The information on their diverse vistas lies mostly scattered in various texts and journals. Accordingly, the maiden attempt to bring forth the pertinent facts and figures in the form of an integrated volume is indeed a commendable and timely endeavor.
Written in lucid style, the book covers myriad aspects of lipid-based formulations and their usage in enhancing the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. The book has been divided into various chapters, each encompassing a sizable account on their design and development, in vitro characterization, in vivo animal studies, and eventually, establishment of IVIVC and IVIVR relationships. Besides, the mechanistic influence of various lipidic constituents and of such formulations during fasted and non-fasted states, and the ultimate fate of lipidic drug products in gastrointestinal milieu have been explicitly elaborated. Amongst the diverse types of self-emulsifying formulations dealt with in the book, important types include liquid SEDDS and SMEDDS, lipid-based isotropic solutions and solid dispersions, hard-capsule formats and supersaturable SEDDS. The remarkable highlight of this book is its industrial outlook that exclusively brings forth the current market status of these lipidic delivery systems, selection of various GRAS-listed excipients for their formulation development, and scaling up the prototype formulations to Phase I/II clinical trial batches.
Based on the famous adage, “a picture is worth one thousand words”, a diversity of illustrations have been immaculately presented as explicative graphs, photographs, methodology flow charts, apparatus outlines, tables, bar charts, etc. that make the book an interesting reading. Each chapter is adequately referenced to the pertinent and updated literature. Most book chapters have been contributed by a galaxy of authors, acclaimed in their respective domains of pharmaceutical technology, analytical research, pharmaceutics, process development, pathology, etc. Special inputs from industry experts tend to enrich the researchers on technical know-how of large scale production of such formulations.
The authors, however, have focused primarily on the conventional self-emulsifying formulations, missing due emphasis on the updates like positively-charged self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS), solid SEDDS and SEDDS of traditional herbal medicines, ample information on which is currently available from literature. It would be much more pragmatic if the newer and expanded edition of the book covers other relevant precepts like federal issues and toxicity concerns (especially when the particle/globule size falls in nano or sub-nano range), application of DoE optimization of such lipidic systems, technology for modification of liquid based systems into solid ones, integration of these methodologies with controlled release ones, and work examples on these novel drug delivery technologies. Another minor peccadillo of the book is that the authors explain the prevalent global perspective of these lipid-based formulations taking instances solely from developed nations representing various continents like USA, UK and Japan. It would be more holistic and pragmatic if the current scenario in the developing nations is also taken into apt consideration.
In nutshell, as already mentioned, the book is likely to serve the acute need of the hour. It can be a pleasure to the product development scientists, pharmacy students and researchers to familiarize themselves with the principles and methodology of lipid-based drug delivery systems. The book can be an excellent addition to the library shelves of drug manufacturing houses and pharmaceutical institutes.

 
Reviewed by: Prof. Bhupinder Singh Bhoop - University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Punjab University

 
S. Bandyopadhyay - UGC Meritorious Doctoral Research Fellow (Pharmaceutics), Panjab University, Chandigarh

 
E-mail: bsbhoop@yahoo.com

 

 

 

Title

: Pharmaceutical Packaging Technology

Author

: U K Jain, D C Goupale, S Nayak

Publishers

: PharmaMed Press, E-mail: info@pharmamedpress.com

 

The packaging of Pharmaceuticals is as much important as the medicine or drug, which is being packed. The quality to any medicine cannot only be imparted by imparting quality in its contents but it is of immense importance how this quality is being protected with continuously changing atmospheric conditions. Proper packaging is the only way to give desired shelf-life to pharmaceuticals.

 
It has been seen that a large number of medicines do not give the desired therapeutic effect due to faulty packaging. Packaging technology has become a separate subject in pharmaceutical sciences due to its vital applications in preserving therapeutic efficacy of drugs. Before starting the book writing on this subject, we noticed that the subject was less understood and it has been compiled with few chapters in some books. This inspired us to present detailed account in the form of a specialized book on the subject. Also the Packaging Technology has emerged as separate subject among specialized subjects of Pharmacy curriculum of almost all Universities.

 
Present book comprises of 16 chapters. The starting page of each chapter consists of chapter summary, which will help the teachers, students and other co-readers in revision of contents of whole chapter in only few minutes. Further the content of each chapter is arranged to facilitate the effortless flow of information in simple, motivating, and commonsensical approach. Detailed physico-chemical information on raw material e.g., glass, plastic, polymers, metals etc., used in Pharmaceutical packaging is presented to facilitate conceptual use of raw material for a particular type of medicinal preparation. Since the raw materials are common for packaging of other products, the scientific information may further be helpful to allied persons who deal with any kind of packaging.

 
A positive effort has been made to cover up all individual and specialized aspects of Pharmaceutical packaging sciences. More information is provided on Pharmaceutical packaging design, based on characteristic properties of material used in packaging. Blister and strips packaging are of growing importance and so a chapter is included on this topic which would be of great value to our readers. Parenteral and ophthalmic products need sterilized packaging; therefore a chapter on sterilization, covering unique features for sterilizing packaging materials, has been included.

 
Because of rising role of European Union as a world center for Pharmaceutical regulation and because of the significance of international harmonization of drug standards, a new chapter on regulatory aspects of Pharmaceutical packaging has been added. Chapters on quality control and stability testing of packages would explain the shelf-life concern aspects of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) packed.

 

 

 

 

Title

: Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy

Author

: Prof. Harkishan Singh

Publishers

: Vallabh Prakashan, E-mail: mail@vallabhprakashan.com

 

This book of Prof. Harkishan Singh is part 2 of part 1, Volume 4 written by him in the series “History of Pharmacy and Related Aspects” now designated as “Builders and Awareness Creators of Modem Pharmacy”. The book is Volume 5 in the series.

 
The book for the purpose of review can be broadly divided in two important sections. Section 1 “Preface, Acknowledgements, Introduction, and Index”. And Section-2 “Profiles of twelve prominent pharmaceutical personages of yesteryears detailing their contributions and lives and presidential addresses of six of them”. To satisfy inquisitiveness of readers, it may be pointed out that Prof. Singh, in part 1, Vol. 4 of the series, has honored Prof. M.L. Shroff by projecting him as titan and icon of Modern Pharmacy. He sees him as the maker of modern pharmacy of India. His profile does not appear in the volume under review except reference wherever necessary.

 
In the acknowledgement the author has expressed his gratitude to the management of archives and libraries of institutions in India and abroad, numbering about one dozen wherefrom he got valuable data for his write-up. The author also contacted individuals and organizations numbering nearly four hundred for same purpose. He has gracefully acknowledged their cooperation by their mention in index and text at appropriate places.

 
In preface and introduction, Prof. Singh gives reason for deviation in his original plan, namely concentration on three subject oriented plan to biographies of prominent individuals who contributed to building of modern pharmacy in India. In preface and introduction the author has made mention of development of western medical systems. As against this, the author observed that the pharmacy component remained largely neglected. It is perhaps, Prof. Singh's this contention that made him change the title. Maintaining his this line of thought, he states “unfortunately pharmacy stood neglected during the British period” that is in pre-independence era. The profession of pharmacy, the author states remained in unorganized and very poor state. The condition according to him was such that to modernize the profession was an uphill task. Its solution is also suggested by the author in the introduction. He states “I had available with me introductory information on many of the professionals who had worked for the building and awareness creation of modern pharmacy, which was a new discipline for us and it required a lot of struggle for getting pharmacy accepted as a partner in the modern health care system”. The way to tread above referred uphill task, Prof. Singh mentions the professionals of yore, who gained prominence during the colonial period and continued to be professionally active in early decades of independent India, could be short listed for profiling”. For this, he had in mind, as could be seen from mid part of Introduction, two stalwarts fulfilling such requirement (i) Jyotish Chandra Ghosh and (ii) Surendra Nath Biswas. In fact, for his regard and respect, Prof. Singh has dedicated the book to J.C. Ghosh stating “Dedicated to the memory of Jyotish Chandra Ghosh, the forgotten and unsung pioneer of Pharmacy”. It seems the author had in mind a shortlist of one dozen stalwarts. For other ten Prof. Singh turned his attention to pharmaceutical forums through which these ten stalwarts jointly sow seeds of modern pharmacy. These seeds broke the ground and the profession has grown to its present state say pillars of modern pharmacy. Most of the pioneers had active professional life ranging from 25 35 years. In the initial stage, they being from different disciplines, there was possibility of difference in their approach. Perhaps in view of this, he has arranged chapters / titled in their name, in alphabetical order.

 
In reference to profiles of twelve pharmaceutical personages, Prof. Singh states “it is done in a way that composite personality of each one is projected properly” This is followed by presidential address at Pharmaceutical Congress of six presidents, by way of seven appendices. The profiles are paragraphed under more or less similar titles, as early life and background; professional study and education, choice of discipline; contribution and achievements etc. Period of activity is stated wherever it is necessary. As stated earlier, it ranges between end of colonial period to early decade of independent India. This period-a wide spanning period of 19 - 20 years, has no sharp cut off line i.e. formation of The Drug Enquiry Committee of 1930 - 31 to enactment of two important professional legislations viz: Drugs Act 1940 and Pharmacy Act 1948. Former sowing the seeds of modern pharmacy and later seeds breaking ground as seedings of modern pharmacy. Former at the foot of uphill task and the latter at the top of it 'dawn of modern pharmacy'. Growth and development took place from these seedings till 1986 when the last luminary Shri Sanktha Prasad breathed his last a period of about 40 years. Prof. Harkishan Singh choice of title for both the volumes is based on this background.

 
While some thought of pursuing their professional activity in the field of education, others preferred research, quality control, industry etc. There were some who apart from their field of choice shared their professional competence by serving as visiting faculty in teaching institutions, consultants in industries and likewise. In the earlier years, their contribution in the field was published in foreign journals and publications. Later with formation of forums they got it published in national journals like Pharma Times; Indian Journal of Pharmacy and similar other publications of pharmaceutical associations and organizations. The stalwarts were however united in the areas like professional education, growth and development of profession of pharmacy and importance of forums for common platforms to achieve such aims and objectives. It is in view of such approach that we have made phenomenal progress towards the goal of the modern pharmacy. It is for this reason, Prof. Singh has rightly projected the luminaries as “Builders and Awareness Creators of Modern Pharmacy.”

 
What is modern or current today would be past by the next decade. New entrants and beginners in the profession will have to shoulder the burden of progress ahead. The profiles provide help and guidance which can be of immense use to shoulder such responsibility. The details of text of appendices can also go a long way in this regard. The text of addresses gives data of progress made, difficulties encountered and possible solutions. Some have forecasted problems and likely difficulties in progress ahead. They have also suggested possible solutions, Quality and importance of details of profiles and addresses can be appreciated only by going through the details.

 
The path of growth and development is thorny and very demanding. Qualitative transformation can be brought by blending of interest, involvement and integrity throughout the journey. Contents of the book provide necessary details and guidance to tread the path for targeted growth and development.

 
I extent my heartiest congratulations to the author Prof. Harkishan Singh for this zealous and untiring effort to archive the pharmaceutical history of India in a prolific, precise and lucid manner. I strongly recommend that educational institutes and pharma organizations keep this publication in their library and promote extensive reading. This book can be a useful orientation programme menu for new entrants and aspirants to acquaint them with historical perspective of our profession.

 
Book Reviewed by Mr. M.R. Shastri, Director (Retired), Drugs Control Administration, Gujarat

 

 

 

Title

: Foundations In Pharmaceutical Biotechnology

Author

: B.P. Nagori, Roshan Issarani

Publishers

: Pharma Syndicate, Tel.: 040-23445666, 23445622, E-mail: info@pharmabooksyndicate.com

 

The field of Biotechnology, in particular, Pharmaceutical Biotechnology has evolved very rapidly since the discovery of INSULIN by Banting and Best in 1922. Currently, hundred of biotechnology based products have hit the market and numerous others are in various phases of clinical development. This textbook “Foundations in Pharmaceutical Biotechnology” has various well compiled chapters on principles of genetic engineering and its applications, bioinformatics, plant tissue culture, animal cell / tissue / organ culture, enzyme immobilization, cell immobilization and their applications etc. The fundamental concepts in all the chapters serve as a good foundation to understand and interpret the latest research and development going in the field of biotechnology.

 
Chapter 4 deals with fermentation technology and its applications in the field of pharmaceutical biotechnology. Chapter 7 is entirely devoted to hybridoma technology and discusses various methods for the production of Monoclonal antibodies. In chapter 14, covers legal and social issues concerning the use of biotechnology and a profile of various regulatory agencies. In addition, the chapter on halometabolites (halogenated organic compounds) is quite informative.
 

In the end, the authors have added a brief section on useful websites and a photo gallery which has some vivid diagrams and illustrations. The book would be of immense help to undergraduate and post graduate pharmacy, science and engineering students. We would like to congratulate the authors for such an excellent attempt to compile a book on a young discipline like Pharmaceutical biotechnology that faces a dearth of quality publications.
 

Book reviewed by: Dr. Rajat Sethi, Texas A&M University, USA and Raman Sehgal, (GVK Biosciences Pvt. Ltd.)

 

 

Title

: Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry

Author

: P. Gundu Rao

Publishers

: Vallabh Publications, Tel.: 011-27342048, E-mail: mail@vallabhprakashan.com

 

Inorganic Pharmaceutical chemistry has not received adequate attention over the years even when many inorganic substances are being used as important medicinal / diagnostic agents and also serves as pharmaceutical aids in the pharmaceutical and chemical industry.

 
This textbook on “Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry” by Prof. (Dr.) Gundu Rao consists of 18 well complied chapters. Chapter on Elements presents the reader with essential facts on elements which find application in medicine, analysis including quality control. The chapter on inorganic toxicology is a welcome addition and enables the readers to learn about hazards of improper use of inorganic salts and their possible treatment by specific antidotes. New approaches in chapters like Water as a pharmaceutical raw material, Homeopathic and Veterinary products are highly appreciated.

 
The author had very meticulously given information on various pharmacopeias including the IP, USP, International Pharmacopeia, British Pharmacopeia and Japanese Pharmacopeia through which an effort has been made to introduce some of the basic characteristics of the expectation from “global pharmacist”. Newer perspectives have been added to traditional topics on diagnostic agents, radiopharmaceuticals and quality control. The innovative approach in this book would receive ready acceptance by fellow academicians and students.

 
Following the chapters, the book also incorporates various useful appendices. Appendix 1 is a compilation of commonly used Greek / Latin prefixes and suffixes. Appendix II is a compilation of Medical terms used in the text book. Appendix III is the listing of inorganic pharmaceuticals according to their application. Appendix IV has important references and it also has a novel section on websites consulted by the authors.
 

The author has very aptly used his experience and his close association with the pharmaceutical industry, regulatory bodies, institutions and other fellow healthcare professionals and academicians. I would like to congratulate Prof. Gundu Rao for such an excellent compilation. The book would be of immense help to pharmacy student and related disciplines of medicine, nursing, nutrition, dentistry, etc.
 

Reviewed by: Dr. P. D. Sethi, Pharmaceutical Analyst

 

 

Title

: Validation in Pharmaceutical Industry - Concept, Approaches & guidelines

Author

: Shri P.P. Sharma

Publishers

: Vandana Publications Pvt. Ltd., LU-56, Vishakha Enclave, Delhi- 110088.

 

In the present scenario of Pharmaceuticals industries, where at every step the analyst has to deal with regulatory compliance, the book titled “Validation in Pharmaceutical Industry” Concepts, Approaches & Guidelines, written by Shri. P. P. Sharma, former Dy. Drugs Controller, Govt. of NCT of Delhi, will definitely be a helpful tool for the technocrats working in the Pharmaceuticals Industries.
 

In this book the author has described all concepts, terminologies, guidelines and different approaches for validation: The book is divided in eleven different chapters. Chapter-1 deals with principles & terminology used in validation. In Chapter 2, definition, concept & options of validation has been defined. Chapter 3 goes deep into the Validation Master Plan (VMP), validation protocol & reports. Chapter 4 describes, organizational structure for validation process. Chapter 5 explains the qualification of premises and validation of HV AC System. Chapter 6 defines the validation of utilities. Chapter 7 & 8 deal with cleaning validation and process validation respectively. Chapter 9 is entirely devoted to validation of some special processes i.e. Aseptic and Lyophilization processes. In Chapter 10, analytical method validation is defined in detail, covering all parameters of validation as per USP & ICH guidelines and Chapter 11 is devoted to computer system validation.
 

I would like to congratulate Shri. P. P .Sharma for such excellent attempt to compile this unique book. The book would be helpful for analysts, production chemist/managers and pharmacy students. I would like to convey my appreciation and best regards to the Author.
 

About the Author: Shri P. P. Sharma is a well known authority in the pharmaceutical field. He is a M.Pharm. (Gold Medallist) from Punjab University and former Deputy. Drugs Controller & Licensing authority; Drugs Control Department, Govt. of N.C.T. Delhi. He was awarded “Best Drug Control Officer Award” at the IPC in 2004. He is a member of the Pharmacy Council of India (PCI) and Chairman, Law Committee, PC I. Shri P. P .Sharma has authored many books in pharmaceuticals fields like. How to practice GMPs, How to practice GLP and cosmetic Formulations, Mfg. & Quality Control.
 

Book Reviewed by Dr. R.A. Singh, Director Technical, Arbro Pharmaceuticals Ltd. New Delhi. Member Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission Committee. (IPC)

 
 
 
 

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